SCGIS 2016 Proceedings BETA  (2016 main)

NOTE, this is a PRIVATE REVIEW page for 2016 Scgis Proceedings Content, please do not copy or share this url or information outside of the circle of authors and presenters involved. The public release for the Scgis 2016 Proceedings is based on your time needed for review, but is hoped for August 2016.

This is our second attempt to assemble the full content of every paper presented, and to also film and photograph every presentation, thanks to lessons learned at our first attempt in 2015. The videos are in iphone/podcast format and will play automatically in firefox, safari and some versions of chrome. IE may require flash plugin.

The SCGIS Board and Conference Committee would especially like to thank all those authors (indicated by the happy face icon) who granted their permission to share their talks with the wider SCGIS Community. It is our international members who constantly remind us of the global scope of our struggle and the importance of sharing what we know with those working in conditions where skills and knowledge are harder to come by.

NOTE: "SCGIS" profile links work if you have logged into SCGIS.ORG in the past day

d HAPPY FACE for AUTHORS WHO HAVE RETURNED 2016 PERMISSIONS, THANKS!

Thur Main Tracks/Presenters

CLIMATE CHANGE (CC) TRACK, THURSDAY (acacia): COASTAL IMPACTS

CC SEA LEVEL: CLIMATE CHANGE COASTAL IMPACTS & SEA LEVEL RISE
dDan Coker, The Nature Conservancy Maine
“ Creating High Accuracy Lidar-based Hydrology for Floodplain Mapping”

d Hannah Friedrich, (student paper)
“Ecological and social resilience to climate variability: The case of the bourgou floodplain vegetation (Echinochloa stagnina) of the Inland Niger Delta in Central Mali”

d#Jacob Kimagl, Wildlife Conservation Society, Papua New Guinea.
“A case study of sea level rise mapping in eight small island communities in New Ireland and Manus Provinces of Papua New Guinea.”

dRhiannon Bezore, University of Melbourne.
“The Drowned Apostles: The Longevity of Sea Stacks over Eustatic Cycle"


CC LAND: CLIMATE RESILIENCE - FORESTS & WATER
d #Olga Ilina, Russia, Karelian Regional Northern Environmental Coalition "How GIS Helps to protect Karelian Forests"

d Javier Arce-Nazario, University of Puerto Rico at Cayey.
“The effects of reforestation in source water for tap water in Puerto Rico.”

dGokarna Thapa
“Assessing Climate-change impacts on Nepal's Forests for Landscape-Scale Spatial Planning ”

PLANNING & COMMUNITIES TRACK THURSDAY (curlew)

INDIGENOUS & COMMUNITY BASED CONSERVATION
d Vivian Banci, Banci Consulting Ltd.
“The Role of Inuit Traditional Knowledge in Evaluating Potential Mining Developments"

dDr Charles Burnett, University of Victoria, Canada
“Web-GIS-based Conservation Tools for First Nations Marine Stewardship”

d #Jean Claude Kalemba, African Wildlife Foundation, DR Congo

d #Caterina Dimitriadis Pampin, Por La Pesca Artesanal (POPA), Uruguay . “Spatio-temporal management considerations for diandric protogynus hermaphroditic species, the case of the common pandora in NW mediterranean.”

d #Jean Luc Ramahavelo, Blue Ventures Madagascar
“GIS and Octopus fishing sites in South western of Madagascar”

AQUATIC & TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION
dJocelyn Tutak, Ecotrust, US
“Mapping the warming Columbia-Snake salmon run: making a case for restoration & connectivity”

d Ben Bond, Penn State, US
“Land Use Impacts on Watershed Health in Lake Erie”

dDr Healy Hamilton, Natureserve
“Toward a Landscape Conservation Design for North American Temperate Grasslands"

SPECIES & BIODIVERSITY TRACK THURSDAY (toyon):
SAVE THE BIRDS AND CATS!


BIRDS & WETLANDS: GIS FOR BIRD HABITAT ANALYSIS & CHANGE DETECTION
d Renee Robison, Colibri Ecological Consulting, Fresno, California
“Quantifying Change in Wetland Extent and Wetland Quality and its Effect on a Western and Clark's Grebe Breeding Population”

d #Iurii Strus, State Museum of Natural History of NAS of Ukraine

dHillary Thompson, (student paper)
“Daily movements and local scale habitat characteristics of areas used by wintering Whooping Cranes”

dJennifer Litteral, PG & E
“Early Bird: Nesting Bird Management Tool”

ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION METHODS
dMeg Southee, Wildlife Conservation Society Canada
“Visualizing Mineral Exploration Impacts on an Threatened Species in Ontario"

dDr. Janet Nackoney, University of Maryland
“Landsat-based Earth observations provide near real-time monitoring of chimpanzee habitat”

d # Maholy Ravaloharimanitra, The Aspinall Foundation, Madagascar
“GIS Analysis of time and weather influence on Prolemur simus’ behavior and home range inside the transfer of management area, case of the COBA Mamelontsoa, Madagascar”

dPhil Satlof , Blue Raster
“From Data to Decisions: Using Dashboards to Improve Access and Use of Community Forest Monitoring Data to Manage Forests and Chimpanzee Habitats in Northern Tanzania ”

ENDANGERED SPECIES METHODS 2: ENDANGERED CATS
d #Cintia Gisele Tellaeche, Andean Cat Alliance, Argentina

dJessica Forrest
“Planning for Alpine Wildlife and Water Resources under Changing Climate”

d #Carlos Daniel De Angelo,Instituto de Biología Subtropical (IBS), Universidad Nacional de Misiones-CONICET, Asociación Civil Centro de Investigaciones del Bosque Atlántico (CeIBA) Argentina
“Regional and local connectivity for jaguars in the Atlantic Forest”

dKatie McKnight, (student paper)
Assessing Wildlife Connectivity in Alqueva Watershed, Portugal

TECHNOLOGY TRACK THURSDAY (chapel): NEW IDEAS SHOWCASE

NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONSERVATION SHOWCASE
dPaul Aarseth, Vulcan, Inc
“Wildlife Conservation using Autonomous Drones”

dJoel Masselink, Vulcan, Inc
“Managing large-scale wildlife survey data with GIS"

Ryan Howell, (student paper)
“Methods for Remote Sensing of Western Juniper”

 

DRONES/UAV FOR CONSERVATION
dFrancis Hourigan, (student paper)
“A Comparison of Image Classifications using UAV Aerial Imagery for Mapping Phragmities Australis in Goat Island Marsh.”

Jeff Miller, GeoWing Mapping
“Tracking Marsh Vegetation Community Changes using UAV-Derived NIR Imagery ”

dSharon Dulava, (student paper)
“Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and fine-scale change detection for assessing reproductive status of colonial nesting waterbirds”


dNate Corder (Audio Only)

ONLINE & COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT
dPatti Diaz, H2O Trash Patrol
“Conservation through Education & Recreation”

Carol Griffin, U.S. Geological Survey
“The National Map Communities of Use"

TECHNOLOGY TRACK FRIDAY (chapel): REMOTE SENSING

RS AND NDVI FOR VEGETATION ASSESSMENT AND CHANGE DETECTION
Chris Soulard, US Geological Survey
“Vegetation monitoring within meadows of the Sierra Nevada Mountains using a continuous Landsat TM time series”

dAnderson Shepard, 2NDNATURE, LLC
“Using Landsat to Measure Conservation Effectiveness of Alpine Meadows”

dSara A. Goeking, Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Forest Service
“A hydrology-dependent method for delineating potential riparian areas”

dArmando Rivera & dSabin Dhital, (student paper)
“Monoculture influence in Land Surface Change of Pindal, Ecuador”

RS methods for SNOW ASSESMENT, LAND COVER and HABITAT
d #Tomomi Kudo, EnVision Conservation Office, Japan
“The relation between seasonal migration and snow depth.”

dZachary Silber-Coats, Silber-Coats Consulting USA
“Satellite Snow Monitoring Methods in the Scott River Watershed”


Fri Main Tracks/Presenters

CLIMATE CHANGE (CC) TRACK, FRIDAY (acacia):
LANDSCAPE IMPACTS

CC DROUGHT: DROUGHT EFFECTS ON HUMAN COMMUNITIES
d Tamara Wilson, U.S. Geological Survey
“Modeling future land-use related water demand in California"


dIris Stewart-Frey, Santa Clara University
"Too little, too warm: California streams under drought”

dLorenzo Booth, (student paper)
“Open source tools for mapping water footprints: A case study in California “

CC EXTREMES: FLOODING & STORMWATER
d
Will DiCharry, The Nature Conservancy
“Tracking the Attainment of Environmental Flow Targets "

dRhiannon Bezore, University of Melbourne
“A Comparative Study Of Passive Versus Dynamic Sea-Level Rise Inundation Models For The Island Of Kauai "

dKelsey Gabriel , BSC Group
“Planning for the Flood: How New England is Creating more Resilient Electrical Infrastructure using GIS"

dJames Kuiper, Argonne National Laboratory
“Quantifying and Informing Extreme Climate and Hydrologic Events"

CC WATER : WATER AVAILABILITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
d Vera Camacho, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur
"Valuation of wetland ecosystem services: The case of the Usumacinta Delta, Mexico"

d # Marlon Prestes, Instituto de Pesquisa em Vida Selvagem e Educação Ambiental – SPVS, Brazil
“Curitiba Metropolitan Water Project”

Chul-Hee Lim, (student paper)
"Impact of Deforestation on Water Availability in North Korea: Forest and Cropland"

CC VEGETATION: CLIMATE CHANGE PHYSICAL EFFECTS ON VEGETATION & THE LANDSCAPE
dAlicia Torregrosa, US Geological Survey
“Fog and low cloud cover maps for North and Central California "

dDean Unger, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority
“Remote Sensing and measuring vegetated landscape; a tool for water conservation"


dDr Allen Roberts Kennesaw State University
“The effects of current landscape configuration on streamflow within selected small watersheds of the Atlanta metropolitan region”

PLANNING & COMMUNITIES TRACK FRIDAY (curlew)

CONSERVATION PLANNING FROM LOCAL LAND TRUSTS TO TRANSNATIONAL
dPaolo Quadri, University of California Santa Cruz (student paper)
Making conservation public in Mexico: using GIS to build a national public land trust from scratch.

dMarina Faber, Peace Parks Foundation
“Rapid node identification as part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park Livelihood Diversification Strategy”

dMatthew Strimas-Mackey, University of British Columbia, Canada
“Accounting for long-term persistence of multiple species in systematic conservation planning”

dFabiano Godoy (& Piyali Kundu), Conservation International, US
“A Framework to Track Sustainability of Landscapes"

SPECIES & BIODIVERSITY TRACK FRIDAY (toyon):
MODELS & MARINE

SPECIES METHODS AND MODELS
dNicholas Santos, Center for Watershed Sciences, UC Davis
"A System for Managing, Mapping, and Understanding Species Range Information"

dJim Graham, Humboldt State Unviersity
Modeling Uncertainty in Habitat Suitability Models with HEMI 2"

dAdam Alsamadisi, University of Tennessee Knoxville
"Using Monte Carlo simulations to Compare Limiting Habitat Factors and Estimate Uncertainty of Suitable Habitat Area Determined by Expert-Based Habitat Models for Red Wolves (Canis rufus) in South Carolina, West Virginia, and Arkansas"

CONSERVATION APPS
dDr. Tosha Comendant Conservation Biology Institute, US
"Engaging stakeholders and informing adaptive landscape conservation and resource management with mapping platforms, portals, and viewers"

Janet Silbernagel, University of Wisconsin-Madison
“Capturing Change in Place: Geotools for Citizen Engagement and Adaptive Design”

Pete Kauhanen, San Francisco Estuary Institute
“Green Plan IT: Green Infrastructure Siting, Modeling, Optimization and Tracking ”

MARINE BIODIVERSITY
dSherilyn Tan, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore"
“Mapping Scleractinian Coral Communities of Singapore using the Geographic Information Systems (GIS)”

d #Francoise Cabada Blanco, Laboratorio de Conservación Marino-Costera, Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela

Emma Accorsi and Maria Lopez-Pena, NASA
“Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Detect, Monitor and Respond to Unprecedented Levels of Sargassum in the Caribbean Sea"

GIS METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
dAimee Fitzgerald
“Implementing GIS Practices in Evaluating Human Well-being Surrounding Gold Mines”

LARGE MARINE ANIMALS AND APEX PREDATORS, FROM WHALES TO SHARKS
dKeith May, Deep Blue Conservancy
“Acoustical Understandings Related to Overlapping Whale Migrations”

Hannah Calich, (student paper)
“Quantifying Habitat Use of Predatory Sharks in the Atlantic Ocean”

TECHNOLOGY TRACK FRIDAY (chapel): REMOTE SENSING

RS for DEFORESTATION AND REFORESTATION
Mayerling Sanabria Buitrago, " Universidad De La Salle (Prior Scholar) “Identification Of Areas To Connectivity Forest In A Cundinamarca Area Through Satellite Image Interpretation.”

d #Ricardo Sandí Sagot,Organization for tropical studies, La Selva, Costa Rica

d #Phien Sayon, Wildlife Conservation Society,Cambodia
“The roles of GIS and Remote Sensing in conservation in Cambodia”

d #Sergei Rusetski, Institute of experimental botany of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus

RS FOR ASSESSING MANGROVES AND INVASIVES
d #Andina Anastasia Krey, USAID(United States Agency for International Development) Lestari, Indonesia
“Mapping spatial distribution of mangrove species using high resolution multispectral data”

d #Zouh Tem Isabella, Cameroon National REDD+,Cameroon
“Vegetation cover change of mangroves linked to species zonation pattern; case of Douala- Manoka, Cameroon”

d Brian Shepard, Clean Water Services
“Online Data Collaboration for Large Scale Habitat Enhancement”

 


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TRACK: CLIMATE CHANGE (CC) TRACK, THURSDAY (acacia): COASTAL IMPACTS
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SESSION: CC SEA LEVEL: CLIMATE CHANGE COASTAL IMPACTS & SEA LEVEL RISE
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d
Dan Coker,
The Nature Conservancy Maine
“ Creating High Accuracy Lidar-based Hydrology for Floodplain Mapping”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
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Video -mp4 HD (716mb)
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ABSTRACT: "In this presentation I will focus on the specific problem of creating accurate hydrologic flow data from high-accuracy lidar-based DEMs and the details of the method I developed to overcome these problems. TNC Maine is currently conducting a natural infrastructure mapping project to both demonstrate the flood attenuation functions that healthy, well-connected floodplains serve and to prioritize floodplains for restoration. Because existing floodplain and riparian area mapping data in much of Maine is either inaccurate or at a scale and resolution too coarse for high-accuracy assessments, we decided to create a new riparian and floodplain dataset from a 2m lidar-based Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The foundation of our floodplain model is an accurate representation of how water flows across the landscape. Because our lidar-based 2m DEM was so precise, every artificial obstruction to flow is well (all too well!) represented in the elevation data (all road beds, railroad beds, etc.). These artificial obstructions to surface water flow can cause large-scale pits to develop upstream when standard flow accumulation analyses are run. These pits cause derived flow lines to be quite inaccurate. To deal with these artificial obstructions and the problems they cause, I have developed a python-based analysis that essentially cuts through all significant artificial obstructions in the elevation model, allowing unobstructed flow-line modeling. Preliminary results are very promising and floodplain models run from the new flow lines are proving much more accurate than any existing datasets."


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d
Hannah Friedrich, (student paper)
“Ecological and social resilience to climate variability: The case of the bourgou floodplain vegetation (Echinochloa stagnina) of the Inland Niger Delta in Central Mali”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
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Video -mp4 HD (716mb)
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ABSTRACT: The case of the bourgou floodplains in the Inland Niger Delta in Central Mali paints a rich history of how vernacular livelihood practices are dependent on stable vegetation and how these practices can be severely disrupted by climate variability and shifting powers of land use control. The ecological value of the bourgou is significant; providing a rich support for an endangered ecosystem and pastoral livelihoods, the floodplain is an oasis that sustains a range of life that is highly conditioned by climate. Community driven bourgou restoration efforts to preserve the practice of pastoralism can be viewed as a social resilience mechanism. Using remote sensing and GIS analysis, this research investigates the relationship of vegetation cover in relation to changing flood regimes from the past thirty years and the effect of bourgou planting on land cover. The motivation for examining the relationship between the presence of bourgou and flood dynamics by using geospatial methods is to better understand how the amount of flooding in any given year as well as recent flood history affects vegetation cover independent of restoration efforts and also contingent on the human led reintroduction of bourgou following the resurgence of floods. Using geospatial methods, dense time stacks of imagery provide an analysis of how land cover change is intricately tied to climatic events and how conservation practices can be monitored and evaluated from remotely sensed imagery


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d
#Jacob Kimagl,
Wildlife Conservation Society, Papua New Guinea.
“A case study of sea level rise mapping in eight small island communities in New Ireland and ManusProvinces of Papua New Guinea.”

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf
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Video -mp4 HD (716mb) (please note we missed filming Jacob's SCGIS talk, this is instead the talk he gave at the scholar's training camp about all of his work and projects in Papua New Guinea)
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ABSTRACT
Low lying small islands in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are at risk due to sea level rise (SLR) as a result of climate change. However, local people know very little or do not know how they will be affected and the PNG government is not currently in a position to advise them. We conducted SLR mapping at eight different island communities in two provinces (New Ireland and Manus Provinces) to identify vulnerable zones on those islands with the help of locals. Laser levels, laser detectors, levelling staffs, and handheld GPS units were used to accurately pick up coastal elevations with reference to the Highest Astronomical Tide (HAT). Local knowledge of HAT formed the baseline for the survey from which 0.5 m and 1 m contour points were added to represent likely sea level rise in the next 50 and 100 years respectively. Simple SLR maps were then generated and repatriated to the communities in order to facilitate local planning and decision making regarding SLR adaptation. Many communities were alarmed with the implication of the mapping and have started devising plans as a result. The inhabitants of Andra Island were particularly concerned – as no natural point on the island was higher than 1 m above HAT.

 

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d
Rhiannon Bezore,
University of Melbourne.
“The Drowned Apostles: The Longevity of Sea Stacks over Eustatic Cycle"

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (716mb)
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ABSTRACT:

" Cliffed rocky coasts are erosional environments, and the remnants of the former cliffs can be preserved as sea stacks as the shoreline retreats. The sea stacks in Victoria, Australia, known as the Twelve Apostles, of which 8 are still standing, are comprised of the Miocene Port Campbell Limestone and reach 45 meters above sea level. Recent aerial LiDAR and multibeam data show five features around 6 kilometers offshore, in 40-50 meters water depth that appear to be sea stacks. The morphological features identified in the LiDAR data were then measured and analysed in ArcGIS V10.1 using the 3D Analyst and Spatial Analyst toolsets, including creating three dimensional profiles and calculating slope. Cliff erosion was analysed for the modern shoreline, using a combination of aerial and satellite images and the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS). Based on the morphology and geology of both the modern and drowned apostles, it is inferred that the drowned stacks evolved in a similar manner to the modern stacks. While the modern sea stacks have an average height of 45.31 meters, the drowned stacks have an average height of only 4.07 meters, suggesting not only a much greater age but also the possibility of multiple exposures to subaerial processes. The drowned stacks lay 655 meters seaward of a drowned cliff averaging 13.61 meters high which likely represents a former interstadial shoreline. "

 

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CC LAND: CLIMATE RESILIENCE - FORESTS & WATER
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d
#Olga Ilina,
Russia, Karelian Regional Northern Environmental Coalition: "How GIS Helps to protect Karelian Forests"

SCGIS Scholars Profile


SCGIS Profiled


Presentation -pdf
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Video -mp4 HD (571mb)
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ABSTRACT

GIS is an everyday tool which helps to make information understandable. With GIS we show to stakeholders different ways to achieve results in nature protection. We put all information together in GIS and we can estimate most valuable areas, their connections and perspectives to protect.

 

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d
Javier Arce-Nazario
, University of Puerto Rico at Cayey.
“The effects of reforestation in source water for tap water in Puerto Rico.”
d

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (678mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

"Using the databases from USGS and the Puerto Rican health department I analyze how the source water quality of large water filtration systems and small rural community systems is shaped by the forest composition. Our research team delineated the watershed for both government-managed water systems and small community managed water systems in Puerto Rico. We compared the composition of the water versus the percentage of forest, urban, and agricultural cover. Nitrate levels were statistically significantly lower at sites that had higher levels of forest cover. Fecal contamination and turbidity was highly correlated to urban and agricultural cover. This analysis demonstrates that a simple model of watershed delineation and knowledge of the land cover is an effective predictor of water composition. The simplicity of the model makes this an ideal approach for reaching policy makers and other local stakeholders. We conclude that understanding how landscape composition shapes water quality can facilitate water management and watershed conservation policies.


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d
Gokarna Thapa
, Nepal
“Assessing Climate-change impacts on Nepal's Forests for Landscape-Scale Spatial Planning ”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
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ABSTRACT:

"Global climate change has emerged as a driver of ecological change, affecting biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services. We used a hybrid system that combines coarse-scale global datasets (downscaled HADCM3 General Circulation Model with 19 WorldClim variables) with terrain-based analyses to identify potential climate resilient areas of forest vegetation in two important conservation landscapes in Nepal for use in climate-change integrated conservation planning. The results from the projections using global datasets indicate that the lower and mid-hill forests are vulnerable to climate change impacts, but the temperate upper montane and subalpine forests will be more resilient, and large areas will remain unchanged. However, the terrain-based analysis indicates there are several climate micro-refugia even in the mid- and lower hills. A conservation strategy should prioritize the larger patches of climate resistant forests as refugia for conserving ecological communities and for continued hydrological flows to downstream communities, but also include the micro-refugia as habitat for endemic and habitat specialist species and also integrate them into climate corridors. Our approach can be applied elsewhere in the Himalaya and other mountainous areas to overcome the constraints of downscaling regional or global datasets to smaller scales and to identify micro-refugia that tend to be de-coupled from regional climate trends for conservation planning."

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CLIMATE CHANGE (CC) TRACK FRIDAY (acacia): LANDSCAPE IMPACTS ================================================================================================================
CC DROUGHT: DROUGHT EFFECTS ON HUMAN COMMUNTIES
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d Tamara Wilson, U.S. Geological Surveyd
“Modeling future land-use related water demand in California"


SCGIS Profile none

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
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ABSTRACT: "Land-use intensification in coming decades will place increasing pressure on California?s already limited water resources. The state is currently experiencing one of the most extreme droughts on record. This coupled with earlier spring snowmelt and projected future climate warming will increasingly constrain available water supplies. We utilized the Land Use and Carbon Scenario Simulator (LUCAS), a state-and-transition simulation model to project spatially explicit (1 km) developed and agricultural land use and associated water demand from 2012 to 2062 for counties within California?s Central Valley and Oak Woodlands ecoregions. Our business-as-usual scenario was based on historical (1992-2012) Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program land use data and county-level water use data, and included continued protection of critically important rangelands and farmland at historical conservation rates. Under current water use efficiency rates, total water demand was projected to increase 4.6% (1.6 million acre feet) by 2062, driven primarily by increases in urbanization and shifts to more water intensive perennial crops (i.e. orchards and vineyards). Continued conservation land acquisition kept rangeland losses at an estimated 7.2%, compared to 12.2% declines without additional protected lands. S cenarios of land-use related water demand are useful for visualizing alternative futures, examining potential management approaches, and enabling better informed resource management decisions."

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dIris Stewart-Frey, Santa Clara University "Too little, too warm: California streams under drought”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
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ABSTRACT: "There is rising concern about increases in the frequency of extreme hydrologic conditions with projected climatic changes. Floods, droughts, and elevated stream temperatures, significantly impact both ecosystems as well as the agricultural sector and the societal fabric. Here we ask what changes in the occurrence of extreme hydrologic conditions can be expected by the end of the century for the important water-generating, mountainous basins of the Sierra Nevada. The extreme conditions considered are very high flows, low flows, and elevated stream temperature as derived from historic and future simulations using the GIS-based Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrologic model, and downscaled output from a General Circulation Model ensemble. Results indicate noteworthy differences in the frequency changes of extremes based on geographic region, season, elevation, and stream size. We found wide-spread increases in the occurrence of stream flows exceeding 150% of historic monthly averages for winter by the end of the century, and extensive increases in the occurrence of both extreme low flows (representing <50% of historic monthly averages), and elevated stream temperatures (>3 øC of monthly averages) during the summer months, with some basins expecting extreme conditions 90?100% of the time by the end of the century. Modeling results are compared to the impact of the recent drought cycle on California streams. Understanding the differences in the changes of extreme conditions can identify climate-sensitive regions and assist in targeted planning for climate change adaptation and mitigation."

 

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dLorenzo Booth,
(student paper)
“Open source tools for mapping water footprints: A case study in California “d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf

d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
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ABSTRACT: California, as a global leader in agricultural production, has unique structural imbalances in the consumptive use of water. Agricultural water supply, both surface and ground waters, is approximately 80% of all developed water for the state; however, different agricultural practices consume water at different rates and rely on different sources of supply. The disconnect between regions of agricultural production and consumption abstract water demand and mask potential resource insecurity within the volumes of water traded between regions in the form of food and produce. In this study, we developed a suite of spatial analysis tools exclusively in the open-source R language and the GDAL library to estimate agricultural water demand for regions of interest, and we compare the resulting water footprints of different agricultural commodities throughout the state depending on the time and region where they are cultivated and under different climate assumptions. The approach combines gridded climate parameters from PRISM with standardized crop parameters and the Spatial CIMIS evapotranspiration model to estimate the crop requirement at any given location in California. We also examine the sensitivity of the water footprint to variations in the typically-surveyed characterizations of land and water use. When compared to water availability in a region, these footprints can be used to evaluate a region's reliance on a particular source and the vulnerability to changes in availability.

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CC EXTREMES: FLOODING & STORMWATER
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dWill DiCharry, The Nature Conservancy
“Tracking the Attainment of Environmental Flow Targets "d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
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ABSTRACT: "Voluntary water transactions have been implemented for nearly a quarter century to restore water to the environment through the established water allocation system in the western United States. Through a working group established by the Science for Nature and People (SNAP) program, representatives from The Nature Conservancy, NFWF, Trout Unlimited, and other academic and conservation organizations have developed a set of indicators to plan and track multi-objective water transaction program goals. One result of this effort is an online data analysis application, the Water Sharing Dashboard, which provides a set of tools to define, analyze, and visualize the efficacy of instream flow transactions in meeting science-based environmental flow requirements. This application automates the analysis of water transaction programs by maintaining a database of water transaction information, integrating with standard, online data sources, including the USGS stream gaging system and the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, and visualizing transaction program results based on these data sources. In addition, the application utilizes web mapping to display an overview of the scale and effectiveness of transaction programs in meeting environmental flow requirements. The tool has been successfully applied to the SNAP Working Group?s case study and pilot project watersheds in Oregon, Nevada, California, and Montana."

 

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dRhiannon Bezore,
University of Melbourne
“A Comparative Study Of Passive Versus Dynamic Sea-Level Rise Inundation Models For The Island Of Kauai "

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
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ABSTRACT: "Using ArcGIS, a sea-level rise inundation comparison was conducted using four different techniques under five sea-level rise conditions for the Kauai, Hawaii, towns of Hanalei Bay, Kapa?a, and Waimea. Sea-level rise was mapped in 0.5 m increments from 0.0 m of rise to 2.0 m of rise. Datasets used in the analysis include a digital elevation model (DEM) layer, wave height data, tidal elevation data, and land cover data. The four techniques illustrating projected inundation serve as a comparison of passive versus dynamic models. The primary goals of this study were to not only compare passive and dynamic sea-level rise inundation models, but also to provide a realistic representation of what future sea-level rise will look like on Kauai, and which areas would be inundated at specific future water surface levels. The results of this analysis can be used to aid Kauai government officials in planning for the future and to aid in prioritizing where and what infrastructure and development will need to be considered before actual sea-level rise impacts occur. "

 

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Kelsey Gabriel ,
BSC Group
“Planning for the Flood: How New England is Creating more Resilient Electrical Infrastructure using GIS"d

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "Climate change research continues to show that storms are intensifying, sea levels are rising, and areas are becoming more susceptible to flooding. In fact, the Boston Harbor Association ?Preparing for the Rising Tide Report? states that preparedness plans need to be implemented to account for future increases in flooding. As a result, National Grid is taking a proactive stance to implement flood protection measures at substations in MA and RI to allow the continuous, reliable delivery of electric service in light of future increases in flooding and storm events. In order to identify the high risk substations in MA and RI, BSC prepared various map sets including hurricane storm surge locations, sea level rise and coastal impact, limit of moderate wave action, and environmental resources. This preliminary GIS effort assisted National Grid in their planning, design, and permitting of temporary flood protection measures. In total, 26 substations have been chosen for upgrades to address the potential for future climate change impacts. BSC is now working to provide site specific inundation mapping, including sea level rise and storm surge, as National Grid begins to design permanent flood protection measures. These maps will take into account site specific criteria including topography, mean high water line, high water marks, and tides. Different scenarios, such as variations in sea level rise and hurricane categories, will be evaluated to create the resilient design solutions."

 

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dJames Kuiper, Argonne National Laboratory
“Quantifying and Informing Extreme Climate and Hydrologic Events"
d


SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "Annual damage costs from extreme weather events exceeds $10 billion in the U.S. and additional environmental consequences are difficult to quantify economically. Location specific data on the intensity, duration, and frequency (IDF) of severe storms and resulting floods is a key factor in planning resilient infrastructure with the goal of avoiding potentially significant environmental and economic losses such as erosion, flooding, transportation disruption, utility interruption, crop damage, and waterborne diseases. We are analyzing historic precipitation and temperature observations, and future projections from climate models, with geostatistics to more precisely map spatial variations of severe storm events, estimate uncertainties, and link rainfall and runoff patterns. Results include location-specific IDF curves for storm durations ranging from 15 minutes to 10 days, and frequencies ranging from two years to 500 years. When this four-year project is complete, results will be shared in an interactive web-based mapping tool as location-specific precipitation, temperature, and flooding IDF plots and tables, and frequency-duration maps for thirteen watersheds that include critical infrastructure across different geographic and climate regions in the U.S. The results will provide engineers and planners with accessible, precise, rigorous, and defensible data for their work, improve the understanding of future risk, and identify cost-effective strategies to enhance resilience."

 

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CC WATER : WATER AVAILABILITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
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dVera Camacho,
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur
"Valuation of wetland ecosystem services: The case of the Usumacinta Delta, Mexico"d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "Usumacinta Delta wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in Mexico, supporting diverse natural functions and providing important services to human societies. However, wetlands are under anthropogenic pressure, particularly due to land use changes, because they have traditionally been treated as areas of low economic value. The main objective of this study was to estimate the economic value of the ecosystem services provided by the wetlands distributed in the Usumacinta Delta. We combined remote sensing and SIG to estimate the land use/land covers together with a value transfer approach to generate baseline estimates of the value of wetland ecosystem services. The results reveal that palustrine wetlands were important not only in terms of coverage (591,989 ha) but by the high economic value representing their ecosystem services, contributing significantly to the total value (80%), estimated at 16,000 million dollars per year. In the map representing the aggregate values of the ecosystem services, highlights the west region of the study area as the highest concentration of values zone, where the palustrine and river wetlands are some of the wetlands with greater presence. According the above and with the overall results obtained in this research, we can argue that the conservation of these environments should be a priority in the design of future management plans."

 

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d# Marlon Prestes, Instituto de Pesquisa em Vida Selvagem e Educação Ambiental – SPVS, Brazil
“Curitiba Metropolitan Water Project”

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: PROJECT OBJECTIVE: The overall objective of the Project is to promote nature conservation actions in areas of water springs and forest remnants in private areas in the metropolitan area of Curitiba, through the implementation of a mechanism called Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES). Made up of 29 municipalities, the metropolitan area of Curitiba is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in Brazil, with 3,223,836 inhabitants, and concentrates 30.86% of the state population. It is also the second largest metropolitan area in the country in extension, with 16,581.21km². The potential for businesses, good infrastructure, the constant development, logistics, industrial expansion and the state government's support can turn the metropolitan area of Curitiba at the headquarters of the largest industrial center in southern Brazil. Because of this existing pressures in the forest remnants and areas of water supply springs the needs for environmental policy clearly outlined at the regional level. THE SPECIFIC OBJETIVES ARE: (1) to contribute to the quality and availability of water for supplying Curitiba and the metropolitan region; (2) to provide technical support through environmental conservation outreach; (3) to value and recognize landowners who carry out actions / or management that includes the protection of water bodies through awards as a way of increasing income; (4) to stimulate the formulation of municipal laws for PES that will result in long-term actions and participation of all sectors of society; (5) to promote arrangements among different players that allow for the structuring of award mechanisms for owners of natural areas; (6) Conduct a conservation education program in the municipal schools of the municipalities in which the project takes place. IMPACT: - Improvement in the quality and quantity of water from public water sources that supply Curitiba and the Metropolitan Region; - Valuation of natural resources and ecosystem services by the population; - Public policies for PES implemented in the municipality(ies); - Promotion of conservation of biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest biome; - Involvement of companies to guarantee the long-term sustainability of the project; - Increase in the income of landowners responsible for the provision of ecosystem services. - Elementary school educators of the Municipalities trained in conservation education and implementing in the classroom, the theme focused on nature conservation and water resources.

 

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Chul-Hee Lim, (student paper)
"Impact of Deforestation on Water Availability in North Korea: Forest and Cropland" d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: Forest Water Yield and Cropland Runoff Deforestation in North Korea is becoming a synonymous with the environmental change occurring in the Korean Peninsula, North Korea has been converting forests to mostly cropland, necessitating research on deforestation with a focus on water of forests and croplands. To identify the change in water quantity of forests and cropland, this study use forest water yield and cropland runoff having an impact on natural land water availability. This research estimates water availability of North Korea’s total forests and croplands using InVEST and EPIC model to analyze three land cover types over the past 30 years. This research found that 74 % of converted forests became cropland, and 68% of converted cropland came from forests. The forest water yields for the past 30 years clearly demonstrate a decrease in time series by deforestation. On the contrary to this, the cropland runoffs for the past 30 years clearly demonstrate a increase in time series by deforestation. In spatially, the converted croplands from forest, showed most high runoff rate at 2000s. Deforestation of North Korea clearly confirmed decreasing water yield in forests, and cropland expansion from deforestation were effect to increase the runoff rate in croplands. Generally, one-third of natural land water availability was disappeared according to deforestation at past 30 years. It can make a more risky environment in food production and water resource at the era of climate change.

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CC VEGETATION: CLIMATE CHANGE PHYSICAL EFFECTS ON VEGETATION & THE LANDSCAPE


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dAlicia Torregrosa, US Geological Survey
“Fog and low cloud cover maps for North and Central California "d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) strongly influences the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystems especially during hot and dry Mediterranean climate summers. This presentation describes FLCC indices and several example applications. Monthly, annual, and decadal FLCC digital maps (indices) were derived for June-September 1999-2009 for coastal California from the Oregon border to Pt. Arguello from 26,000 hourly night and day Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images. Monthly average FLCC ranges from <2 to 18 hours per day (h/d). Average FLCC over the ocean increases from north (9 h/d) to south (14 h/d), whereas on land, FLCC is highest where land juts into the prevailing NW winds and is lowest in the lee of major capes. FLCC advects farthest inland through low-lying NW ocean-facing valleys. At night, average total hours of FLCC are higher more frequently on land than over the ocean. The interannual FLCC coefficient of variation shows long-term geographic stability that is strongly associated with landform position. FLCC hours per day mapped contours, derived from decadal average FLCC, delineate the commonly used term ?fog belt? into FLCC zones with increased locational precision. FLCC indices can improve analyses of biogeographic and bioclimatic species distribution models; understanding meteorological mechanisms driving FLCC patterns; solar energy feasibility studies; investigations of ecohydrology, evapotranspiration, and agricultural irrigation demand; and viticulture ripening models."

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dDean Unger, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority
“Remote Sensing and measuring vegetated landscape; a tool for water conservation"
d


SCGIS Profile none

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "The Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority(SAWPA), under the California Prop 84 Emergency Drought grant program, is currently managing a large scale project involving high resolution image-based remote sensing within the Santa Ana River Watershed. This project measures the amount irrigated vegetation in a meter service area (MSA) to estimate outdoor water budgets for individual retail customers to assist retail water agencies in the implementation of a water rate structure based upon the efficient use of water. The imagery is 3 band plus Infrared, 3inch resolution covering approximately 2400 square miles representing 72 state reporting agencies and over 6 million customers. Using a combination of ArgGIS Desktop and Erdas, SAWPA was able to accurately measure vegetation such as turf and trees to provide a base outdoor budget. The benefits to customers were that their outdoor budget better reflected what water was needed and allowed a starting point for future discussions with customers on how they were watering their landscape. The presentation will cover challenges of managing data analysis and data deliverables that represent over 4 terabytes of data, 24 flight days, 5 wholesale water agencies and 72 retail water agency territories. Focus will be given to the technology and methodology utilized to automate the delineation of vegetation and how it benefits water customers in the Santa Ana River Watershed . "

 

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dDr Allen Roberts, Kennesaw State University
“The effects of current landscape configuration on streamflow within selected small watersheds of the Atlanta metropolitan region”
d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "This study investigated impacts of current landscape configuration on stream-flow within selected small watersheds of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan region (AMR). To determine effects of current landscape arrangement on watershed-wide Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)-12 land cover/land use (LC/LU), the configurational metric of contagion was chosen. Contagion-adjusted curve numbers (CNs) were calculated for all405 HUC-12 watersheds in the AMR. 6 watersheds were chosen for Thornthwaite Water Balance (TWB) model evaluation based upon having a stream gage record of the 5 year (60 month) period most closely associated with contagion and CN values derived from the 2011 National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD). 4 watersheds out-performed their original CN watershed simulations based upon: Nash?Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE); room mean square error (RMSE)-standard deviation ratio (RSR); and Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) analysis. Configurational metrics related to contagion of the aggregation index (AI) and clumpiness index (CI) indicated possible reasoning to explain differences found between the 4-watershed and 2-watershed categories. Both may lead to complex flow patterns not easily estimated within streamflow simulations."

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PLANNING & COMMUNITIES TRACK THURSDAY (curlew) ================================================================================================================
INDIGENOUS & COMMUNITY BASED CONSERVATION
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Vivian Banci, Banci Consulting Ltd.
“The Role of Inuit Traditional Knowledge in Evaluating Potential Mining Developments"

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

"Climate change research continues to show that storms are intensifying, sea levels are rising, and areas are becoming more susceptible to flooding. In fact, the Boston Harbor Association ?Preparing for the Rising Tide Report? states that preparedness plans need to be implemented to account for future increases in flooding. As a result, National Grid is taking a proactive stance to implement flood protection measures at substations in MA and RI to allow the continuous, reliable delivery of electric service in light of future increases in flooding and storm events. In order to identify the high risk substations in MA and RI, BSC prepared various map sets including hurricane storm surge locations, sea level rise and coastal impact, limit of moderate wave action, and environmental resources. This preliminary GIS effort assisted National Grid in their planning, design, and permitting of temporary flood protection measures. In total, 26 substations have been chosen for upgrades to address the potential for future climate change impacts. BSC is now working to provide site specific inundation mapping, including sea level rise and storm surge, as National Grid begins to design permanent flood protection measures. These maps will take into account site specific criteria including topography, mean high water line, high water marks, and tides. Different scenarios, such as variations in sea level rise and hurricane categories, will be evaluated to create the resilient design solutions."

 

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d
Dr Charles Burnett, University of Victoria, Canada
“Web-GIS-based Conservation Tools for First Nations Marine Stewardship”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

"Marine stewardship in British Columbia is increasingly complex, contextualized by our First Nations? strong rights and title positions, and evolving co/management regimes. Small teams of fisheries managers, planners and technicians are being tasked with monitoring, assessment and planning tasks that would normally be the remit of well-staffed provincial departments. Over the last 10 years, First Nations stewardship managers have been searching for information systems that bring spatial analysis more efficiently and seamlessly into the day-to-day operations of all staff. Several decision-support systems have emerged using web-GIS technologies to address this challenge.Technically, these systems consist of: geodatabase back-ends (commonly PostGIS) and an HTML/JS/CSS front end, spatial libraries, and PHP or Python code. All of the systems do two key functions: (1) help to manage large cultural and ecosystem geodatabases, and (2) provide tools to mobilize the geo knowledge base in specific contexts such as: project/permit impact assessment, cumulative impacts assessment, compiling evidence to support legal cases. The geospatial analyses thus are varied: from proximity reports, to spatial modelling and visualization, to spatial key-phrase searches. Each system goes some way towards providing necessary efficiencies to stewardship office staff, but gaps remain. For example, the following features would be useful when incorporated: secure links to government databases, incorporating management tools outside of conservation (fee-simple lands, environmental management), mobilizing knowledge for schools, managing field survey data, and stewardship staff time-tracking and billing."

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d #Jean Claude Kalemba, African WildlifeFoundation, DR Congo. " The Contribution Of Participatory Mapping In The Definition Of Rural Development Areas And Promotion Of Sustainable Agriculture"

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT

Since 2006, the African wildlife Foundation (AWF) has been leading conservation activities in the Maringa Lopori Wamba Landscape, located in northern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), as part of the USAID-funded Central Africa Program for the Environment (CARPE) program. The primary mission of this work is to reduce the rate of forest degradation and loss of biodiversity while developing a participatory plan for sustainable natural resource management within. This presentation will focus on participatory micro-zoning taking place near the village of Djolu, located in the eastern part of the landscape. Analysis of socio-economic survey data collected in this area reveal high levels of poverty and full dependence on surrounding forests for human livelihoods. Due to previous civil conflict and two wars that occurred in the DRC 1995-2003, these communities are now mostly isolated, have poor access to markets, and their once-thriving coffee and rubber tree plantations are now inactive. Consequently, uncontrolled hunting and slash-and-burn-agriculture are the main livelihood activities for local communities. Rapid expansion of slash-and-burn agriculture threatens the forest habitats of many important terrestrial species living in this area, including the bonobo ape and Congo peacock. A main goal of our work in this area is to reduce losses of forest cover by engaging local communities in participative land use planning and offering support and agricultural extension to intensify food production in established zones that limit deforestation. This presentation will highlight the key methods, challenges, and results of these participatory zoning activities with 45 villages in the study area. The main contribution is to demonstrate how participatory mapping of agricultural areas can support economic and ecological agriculture to reduce losses on forest cover.

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d #Caterina Dimitriadis Pampin,
Por La PescaArtesanal (POPA), Uruguay . “Spatio-temporal management considerations for diandric protogynus hermaphroditic species, the case of the common pandora in NW mediterranean.”

SCGIS Scholar Profile d

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT

The common pandora, Pagellus erythrinus (Linnaeus, 1758), a high-value species, which landings have been declining since the 90´s becoming overexploited in several European fisheries. Although it shows a hermaphrodite reproductive strategy, in Spain, the management of the common pandora is currently based only on legal sizes; being the minimum legal catch size smaller than the mean size at sexual maturity of females. Thus, current managerial scheme may not be appropriate as it could lead to a decrease in the female ratio of the population and a change in the maturation patter as response to the pressure due to the fishing activity. GIS tools play a priority role supporting scientific advice in the development of a sustainable marine management of the fishery through specific actions such as the identification of potential interaction zones between the fishing activity and the vulnerable life stages of the population (i.e. fish of smaller size) and the understanding of the spatial pattern of the species (i.e. development of prediction models to identify potential closure areas by season).



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d #Jean Luc Ramahavelo, Blue Ventures Madagascar “GIS and Octopus fishing sites in South western of Madagascar”

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT

Marine ecosystems in the southwest of Madagascar are under pressure from fishers by the practice of bad fishing technique, beach seine, by using nets with very fine mesh, etc. Touched by this, Blue Ventures (BV) has settled with the objective to rebuilding tropical fisheries with local communities. BV recognizes too that managing fisheries and marine resources works best when it is in the hands of local communities. Many are the elements useful for achieving these objectives, which include mapping. In the fisheries project where I am working, knowing the surface of each fishing site in each village is very important to be able to determine the stock of resources that they produce, probably with other scientific data and to have the right choice of site for a reserve local. To do this, we took the methodology of participatory mapping because only the coastal communities who know their area. The method proceeds by: Collecting all of their landmarks that they use to locate when they go fishing. This involves by taking the geographical coordinates with communities’ help. These points will be transferred into Google Earth or ArcGIS (The choice depends on where we will work after about internet connecting, if there will have we use directly Google Earth, if not we use ArcGIS) which will easily guide the communities for the second spot below. Defining the boundaries of their each octopus fishing sites. When you will use ArcGIS, we print a Google Earth images with the landmarks and then puts above transparent papers, communities draw on those papers that we will scan after and then we georeferenced that in ArcGIS but, when we use Google Earth, we project directly Google Earth images and communities draw directly on. The day after we check some sites by taking the geographical coordinates of their corners and overlap them if they are right or not. Until now, we had already work in seven villages (Andavadoaka and Nosy Ve in the north of Toliara, Ambohibola, Andrenosy, Lembeitake, Ambola and Tariboly in the south of Toliara). In 50%, the results are satisfactory but, in other villages most of communities do not understand the image that we show them. That is why fisheries project does not stop searching a good method or good satellite images to help guide communities and simply georeferenced it in Arc GIS after.

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AQUATIC & TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION
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dJocelyn Tutak, Ecotrust, US
“Mapping the warming Columbia-Snake salmon run: making a case for restoration & connectivity”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT

" Salmon play an integral role in the ecology, culture, and economy of the Pacific Northwest, and yet face a multitude of challenges to their long term survival. In particular, climate change is warming freshwater habitat and affecting salmonids at every stage of their life cycle. Additionally, dams create barriers to fish passage and alter flow, sedimentation, and temperature. During particularly hot and dry conditions, federal agencies may release cool water to streams to protect salmon, diverting it from other uses like irrigation for farming. These diversions increase already heightened tensions between local stakeholders, making long-term salmon restoration difficult. Are these cool water diversions making a difference if their benefits are then diminished by the habitat-altering effects of dams? We are currently undertaking a spatial analysis to identify where warming stream temperatures due to climate change will affect salmon at specific life stages and where dams may influence that warming effect. Our focus is on the Snake and Columbia rivers in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. We are using regionally-aggregated fish usage data and the U.S. Forest Service?s NorWeST Regional Database and Modeled Stream Temperatures to show, through analysis and compelling outreach, that the benefits of these water releases are dwarfed by the negative effects of dams."

 

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d
Ben Bond, Penn State, US “Land Use Impacts on Watershed Health in Lake Erie” (photo unavailable, video cap substituted)

SCGIS Profile
d

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT

"Watershed health and water quality is important to all forms of life on Earth. Recent increases in the number and intensity of algal blooms in the Western Basin of Lake Erie have highlighted the importance of understanding how current watershed management and agricultural land use contribute to algal blooms. While non point source pollution can be identified, determining the impact of non point source pollution from agricultural land use is more difficult. Utilizing ArcGIS, land use metrics are spatially tabulated for catchment basins above stream based sample points. These land use metrics are then spatially linked to Index of Biological Integrity (IBI) values that reflect watershed health. These values are compared to statewide attainment goals using NHD stream networks. This study provides a methodology for rapidly assessing impact of land use on watershed health and provides further insight into phenomena causing hazardous algal blooms in Lake Erie. Furthermore, areas of concern are identified providing opportunities for further study and mitigation to enhance water quality. "

 

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dDr Healy Hamilton, Natureserve
“Toward a Landscape Conservation Design for North American Temperate Grasslands"

SCGIS Profile
d

Presentation -pdf none

Video -mp4 HD (521mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

 

 

 

 

 

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PLANNING & COMMUNITIES TRACK FRIDAY (curlew) ================================================================================================================
CONSERVATION PLANNING FROM LOCAL LAND TRUSTS TO TRANSNATIONAL
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dPaolo Quadri, University of California Santa Cruz (student paper)
Making conservation public in Mexico: using GIS to build a national public land trust from scratch.d


SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

"During most of the XX century, the agrarian reform in Mexico, and its associated process of land distribution led to the privatization of nearly 98% of the Mexican territory, either in the form of individual or collective private property, thus leaving approximately 65% of the population and the Mexican State landless. This massive land privatization process has generated several intertwined social and ecological issues. First, a severe situation of inequality in which most of the population lacks the right to access and enjoy public lands for recreational and conservation purposes. Second, a self-reinforcing cycle of poverty and ecological degradation mechanism. And third, a series of institutional obstacles that constrain the design and implementation of policy instruments for conservation and land management. In this presentation, I will share some of the conceptual and practical aspects of the National Land Trust for Public Conservation of Mexico, a project that I have been working on as part of my PhD research in collaboration with the Mexican federal government, and whose goal is to acquire and destine approximately 20 ? 25% of land in Mexico for conservation purposes under public property. Specifically, I will discuss some ideas and challenges around the Land Selection and Incorporation System (LSIS), a geographic information system that uses multiple social, economic, and biophysical variables to determine land acquisition priorities and best management strategies."

 

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d
Marina Faber, Peace Parks Foundation
“Rapid node identification as part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park Livelihood Diversification Strategy”d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

"The Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park (GLTP) straddles the borders between Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Since the treaty signing in 2002, attention has been on the governance mechanisms as well as the establishment and development of protected areas. A need to shift focus to the surrounding communities has been initiated by the GLTP Joint Management Board, this directly relating to treaty objectives concerning beneficiation of the local communities. Consequently, a project to develop a livelihood diversification strategy for the area surrounding the GLTP was initiated. Part of this project was to identify focus nodes where the first phase of implementation would take place. The focus of this paper is on the rapid GIS analyses to identify nodes using limited available data and time and whether the rapid assessment was worth the effort. Objectives and sub-objectives related to node identification were created and weighted. Objectives related to poverty levels, population density, climate change hotspots and more. The result of the analyses was a preference layer ranging from 1-9, where the higher values indicated a higher nodal preference. This layer was then subjectively classed into eight nodes. During a workshop these were further moulded by participants with a final eight nodes identified. Only three of the eight nodes were largely changed from what was initially identified. The rapid assessment allowed all stakeholders to engage and debate the various inputs culminating in the final decision support analyses."

 

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d
Matthew Strimas-Mackey, University of British Columbia, Canada
“Accounting for long-term persistence of multiple species in systematic conservation planning”d


SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

"Systematic conservation planning offers a structured, and scientifically defensible, approach to designing protected area networks that efficiently meet conservation objectives. The current paradigm focuses on meeting area-based representation targets. However, such approaches offer no guarantee that the spatial configuration of the resulting reserves will support the persistence of biodiversity. Metapopulation theory provides a framework within which to study how reserve configuration affects spatial population dynamics, and hence persistence. Yet, despite substantial interest in metapopulation theory and systematic conservation planning, few attempts have been made to combine them. I present a method for reserve design that maximizes persistence across multiple species for a given fixed cost. This method is based on metapopulation capacity, a relative metric of species persistence that accounts for landscape configuration and species-specific dispersal. Unlike other reserve design tools, the method I present is explicitly accounts for spatial population dynamics. To demonstrate the use of this method, I present a case study from Indonesian New Guinea, an area of high diversity and endemicity that is experiencing significant land conversion pressure. Compared to a Marxan reserve design exercise, this new approach increases metapopulation capacity by a factor of 2.3, with no additional cost and only a modest decrease in representation."

 

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dFabiano Godoy (& Piyali Kundu), Conservation International, US
“A Framework to Track Sustainability of Landscapes"d

SCGIS Profile

Presentation -pdfd

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
(Note the speaker is Fabiano, not Piyali as stated in the video credits)
d


ABSTRACT:

"To assist in national long-term deforestation and emissions reductions commitments, Conservation International piloted its first Sustainable Landscapes Partnership (SLP) programs in the province of North Sumatra in Indonesia and the Alto Mayo Watershed in Peru. The SLP developed a lightweight, yet replicable and reliable Landscape Accounting Framework (LAF) to monitor the status of key indicators of sustainability within the landscape to facilitate informed decision-making by the project and its stakeholders. Built on a foundation of three pillars that collectively characterize sustainability (i.e., Natural Capital, Production, and Human Well-Being), the LAF was developed as a low cost, holistic, scalable, and replicable framework, incorporating a diverse array of indicators based off reliable and freely available data sources provided by accredited and recognized institutions and government censuses. The LAF yielded interesting results with regards to increasing threats to natural capital, while also identifying some weaknesses in production and human well-being. The resulting analysis was translated to a functioning web application system, leveraging reliable, pre-existing technologies such as Tableau Public, ArcGIS Online, and Bootstrap to provide a robust and cost-effective means of communicating progress and improving transparency to project stakeholders and donors that can be easily replicated throughout other landscape sites."

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SPECIES & BIODIVERSITY TRACK THURSDAY (toyon): SAVE THE BIRDS AND CATS!

BIRDS & WETLANDS: GIS FOR BIRD HABITAT ANALYSIS & CHANGE DETECTION
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dRenee Robison, Colibri Ecological Consulting, Fresno, California
“Quantifying Change in Wetland Extent and Wetland Quality and its Effect on a Western and Clark's Grebe Breeding Population”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT: "Western and Clarks grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis and A. clarkii; respectively) are sympatric water birds that breed at inland lakes and reservoirs. Both species are wetland-obligate nesters that build floating nests constructed-of and anchored-to emergent vegetation. Despite grebe dependence on flooded wetland habitat for nesting, the relationships among lake level, wetland availability, and reproductive success have not been well quantified. We modeled eleven years of reproductive data collected at Eagle Lake, California. This lake is a closed-drainage system, whose annual lake level varies drastically with annual rainfall and evaporation. We used remote sensing techniques to quantify changes in wetland availability relative to inter-annual lake level changes. An information-theoretic approach was used to assess the relationship among and importance of these habitat variables in relation to grebe reproductive success. Our results indicate that lake level is a key factor affecting wetland availability and population-level reproductive success. Our findings also indicate an optimum water level where management is likely to be most effective. We strongly recommend that wetland managers consider the effects of water level on breeding habitat availability and reproductive success of grebes and other over-water nesting birds."

 

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d
#Iurii Strus, State Museum of Natural History of NAS of Ukraine
"Usage of GIS in Bird Conservation in the Ukranian Forest Zone"

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile


Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
d

ABSTRACT:

Paper shows changes in conservation practice in forests of three forestry companies in Western Polissia of Ukraine after justification of these changes basing on provided data and analysis of distribution of nests and nesting territories of rare bird species – Black Stork (Ciconia nigra). In the analysis, these factors were taken into account: forest logging, level of forest fragmentation, age of forests and prevailing species of trees on breeding plots.

 

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dHillary Thompson, (student paper)
“Daily movements and local scale habitat characteristics of areas used by wintering Whooping Cranes”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
d

Video -mp4 HD (mb)
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ABSTRACT: "Few studies have assessed winter habitat use of reintroduced Whooping Cranes, and knowledge of local scale habitat characteristics is critical to managers of this endangered species. The Eastern Migratory Population (EMP) of Whooping Cranes was established in 2001 and currently consists of approximately 100 cranes that breed in Wisconsin and winter in areas as far north as Indiana and as far south as Florida. Remote sensing can provide consistent land cover data at a fine spatial resolution that cover the entire winter range of this population. The objectives of this study are to quantify daily movement and identify local scale habitat characteristics of areas used by wintering Whooping Cranes in the EMP. During 2015 and 2016 we used radio telemetry to track 20 and 23 groups of Whooping Cranes, respectively, each for one full day. We collected location, habitat, and behavioral data every 30 minutes from before dawn until after dusk. Daily home range sizes averaged 3.6 km 2 in 2015 and 4.1 km 2 in 2016, calculated with 95% kernel density estimates. During both winters, Whooping Cranes moved an average of 8.4 km in one day. We overlaid crane location data with remotely-sensed land cover data to describe habitat characteristics of wintering areas during these two years. This research helps managers better understand the winter habitat needs of this population and informs management decisions and protection of wintering areas used by reintroduced Whooping Cranes. "

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dJennifer Litteral, PG & E
"Early bird Nesting bird management tool
“Daily movements and local scale habitat characteristics of areas used by wintering Whooping Cranes”

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation -pdf
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ABSTRACT:

 

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ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION METHODS
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dMeg Southee, Wildlife Conservation Society Canada
“Visualizing Mineral Exploration Impacts on an Threatened Species in Ontario"

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: "Boreal woodland caribou, a species-at-risk in Canada and endangered in Ontario, are under threat from habitat loss and fragmentation stemming from mineral exploration and the subsequent cumulative impacts of mines, roads, dams and power transmission. Despite a caribou conservation plan that emphasizes the need to manage disturbance at regional scales, current planning processes are unfolding in Ontario?s Far North at scales that do not consider the range-wide needs of caribou. Previously, WCS Canada has been instrumental in developing monitoring techniques for caribou, creating endangered species legislation, and acting as scientific advisors on caribou issues. Currently, we are modelling cumulative impacts and advocating for a Regional Strategic Environmental Assessment process for new mining and infrastructure development in Ontario?s Far North. To support our work on caribou conservation, I developed a system to monitor mineral exploration permits and track the location and associated impacts occurring in designated caribou ranges in Ontario. This system has enabled WCS Canada to provide meaningful, public, and up-to-date comments on mineral exploration proposals that affect caribou. This presentation will outline how I used Python scripts and ArcGIS Online to harness ambiguous data from the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines and the Ontario Environmental Registry and turn it into useful information that can be visually interpreted using time-enabled web maps. "

 

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dDr. Janet Nackoney, University of Maryland
“Landsat-based Earth observations provide near real-time monitoring of chimpanzee habitat”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: "The endangered chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes ) is threatened by habitat loss from resource extraction and land conversion, as well as hunting, disease and the illegal pet trade. More than approximately 70% of the chimpanzee's tropical forest habitats in Africa are now threatened by land use change. Recent developments in remote sensing and cloud computing enable the use of satellite observations to provide a synoptic view of chimpanzee habitats at finer spatial and temporal resolutions that are locally relevant and consistent across the entire species? range . We present a practical Decision Support System to be used by the Jane Goodall Institute and partners to annually monitor and forecast chimpanzee habitat health in Africa. The system integrates Earth observations from 30-meter Landsat data with a species-specific habitat model and a model forecasting future land use change, enhanced by field data collected by local communities and rangers using the Open Data Kit app and Android mobile smartphones and tablets. While coarser-scale and static chimpanzee habitat models have been previously developed, this project is unique in developing a dynamic monitoring system, updated annually via Landsat data, for systematically monitoring threats and changes across this keystone species? habitat. In addition, it can serve as an important indicator of overall ecosystem health for tropical forests in Africa."

 

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dMaholy Ravaloharimanitra, The Aspinall Foundation, Madagascar
“GIS Analysis of time and weather influence on Prolemur simus’ behavior and home range inside the transfer of management area, case of the COBA Mamelontsoa, Madagascar”

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile


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ABSTRACT: " Starting in 2009, our Madagascar project has focused on the greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus). This species is locally known as “Godroka” and is classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN since 2002. Until 2012, it was considered the 5th most endangered primate in the world. Many of the known sites where the species is occurring don't have a permanent protection status yet. However, local community organizations, known COBA, do exist at several sites. We are currently supervising 12 of these COBA, many of which still lack legal status and sufficient management capacity. In order to increase local capacity, we are closely working with 6 of those communities, emphasizing the reciprocal links between biodiversity and human action and wellbeing. We assist local communities in preserving their forests' biodiversity and vital resources and have started an easy management system, which is being implemented, followed and evaluated by the local community itself. We present VOI Mamelontsoa as a case study for that approach. The rainforest under their management covers about 4,000 ha in the Alaotra-Mangoro Region of eastern Madagascar. A grid reference system for monitoring lemurs and threats was established, covering the four Critically Endangered primate species of this forest (Prolemur simus, Varecia variegata, Propithecus diadema, Indri indri). Local monitoring agents also take notes when observing other animals. Community-based monitoring started in 2010 and was extended to plants last year. Monitoring plots are being used for a comprehensive floral inventory as well as for assessing forest dynamics. All monitoring data collected will help improve management by the local community, permitting to define zones of high conservation importance and others in which natural resources can be sustainably used. The data will result in an updated simplified development and management plan.


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dPhil Satlof , Blue Raster
“From Data to Decisions: Using Dashboards to Improve Access and Use of Community Forest Monitoring Data"

dSCGIS Profile

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ABSTRACT: none

 


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ENDANGERED SPECIES METHODS 2: ENDANGERED CATS
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#Cintia Gisele Tellaeche, Andean Cat Alliance, Argentina

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile


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ABSTRACT: The Andean and Pampas cat (Leopardus jacobita and L. colocolo) are two closely related small felids sharing a number of ecological and morphological characteristics. The Andean cat shares all its distribution range with the Pampas cat and is affected by the same conservation threats within that area. The IUCN categorizes the Andean cat as Endangered and the Pampas cat as Near Threatened. Both species are poorly known, although in the last years there was an increase in the amount of studies focused on them. The main objectives were to determine the home range size of individuals of both species and evaluate the spatial overlap between them species using GPS-collars, in an area in the High Andes of Jujuy province, Argentina. After 148 days of live trapping, five Andean cats and four Pampas cats were capture. We put GPS-collars to four individuals of each species; due to technical failures in the collars we did not obtain as many data as we should have (obtaining data of three individuals of each specie). The sizes of home ranges of both species were larger than expected on the basis of the allometric function relating this parameter to carnivore body masses. The average home range sizes for the Andean cat were 79.89 Km2 (Minimum Convex Polygon), 46.89 Km2 (Kernel 95%), and 13.16 Km2 (core area: Kernel 45%). The Pampas cat had home range sizes of 20.52 km2, 14.86 km2, and 5.08 km2, respectively. The average home range overlaps estimated by the Kernel 95% were 59.63% for the Pampas cat, 58.1% for the Andean cat, and 53.98% between species; using the Kernel 45% overlaps were 48.9%, 45%, and 45.77%, respectively.

 

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Jessica Forrest, Biodiversity & Spatial Planning Specialist (Independent)
“Planning for Alpine Wildlife and Water Resources under Changing Climate”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: "How do wildlife habitat and ecosystem services overlap, and how should we manage for each under changing climate? In this study, we use GIS to address this question at two spatial scales using the snow leopard and water resources as examples. The snow leopard is an endangered predator of the high mountains and steppe of Asia, with its presence often indicative of ecosystem health. To identify snow leopard habitat most important for water provision to downstream human communities, we developed regional-scale maps of water towers in snow leopard habitat and the number of downstream people served by those water towers. To determine climate vulnerability, we mapped human impact, climate envelope change, past climate variability, and permafrost. We found that over 300 million people live near a river with its headwaters in the snow leopard range; the headwaters to the westernmost basins, including the Indus and Amu Darya, are particularly crucial water sources for downstream human communities. These areas are also important for snow leopards, and will remain important for both water and snow leopards under changing climate with adequate planning. Snow leopard habitat and water towers in the eastern portion of the range may be relatively vulnerable to climate-related shifts. For site-scale management, we next mapped important areas for snow leopards and water provision under changing climate at finer-resolution in the Kanchenjunga landscape of the Eastern Himalayas.

 

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#Carlos Daniel De Angelo, Instituto de Biología Subtropical (IBS), Universidad Nacional de Misiones-CONICET, Asociación Civil Centro de Investigaciones del Bosque Atlántico (CeIBA) Argentina
“Regional and local connectivity for jaguars in the Atlantic Forest”

SCGIS Scholar Profiled

SCGIS Profile


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ABSTRACT: The Atlantic Forest (AF) is a global biodiversity hotspot distributed in eastern Brazil, eastern Paraguay and northern Argentina, which has lost ≈90% of its range. The jaguar is the top predator in the AF, but due to its habitat requirements this felid is seriously threatened. For preserving the last jaguars of the AF, regional and local strategies are critical. In an international effort, jaguar specialists determined the priority jaguar subpopulations of jaguars that remain in the AF. We developed a least-cost-corridor analysis to evaluate potential corridors among jaguar subpopulations. We found that, although some subpopulations could be connected by corridors, most of them are practically isolated. Zooming in to the largest jaguar subpopulation, we focused in the most important areas for internal connectivity. In these areas, we used graph-based models and Conefor 2.6 to determine the relative importance of the remaining forest patches for maintaining habitat connectivity. This prioritization at patch level was consistent with the local laws for forest protection and management. Different connectivity analysis tools offered specific solutions for jaguar conservation in the AF. Least-cost corridors served as a practical tool for identifying the most isolated subpopulations at a regional scale. Graph-based models and Conefor were important for finding specific forest patches where local actions will have a huge impact for preserving jaguars in the main subpopulations.

 

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Katie McKnight, (student paper) " Assessing Wildlife Connectivity in Alqueva Watershed, Portugal"

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: This study investigates the changes in habitat fragmentation by comparing land cover of 1990 (pre-dam) and 2006 (post-dam) conditions around Alqueva Reservoir in Southern Portugal. Habitat opportunities, constraints and composite suitability maps were created for European wildcat, European polecat and lesser kestrel. Furthermore, this study analyzed ecological corridors between habitat patches through least cost path models in ArcGIS to determine the most critical areas for conservation and habitat enhancement. The change in most suitable habitat for the European wildcat, European polecat and lesser kestrel in terms of overall land abundance was approximately 16%, -9% and -19% respectively. All three species experienced a negative change in the average size of habitat patches. The reasons for these changes are likely a combination of land use changes from increased water availability, land abandonment and land inundation. The total area of ecological corridors as determined by least-cost path analyses increased for European wildcat, European polecat and lesser kestrel by 6.7%, 1.2%, and 7.7% respectively. The results and recommendations aim to serve as references for future planning, management, and governance around Alqueva Watershed.

 

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SPECIES & BIODIVERSITY TRACK FRIDAY (toyon): MODELS & MARINE

SPECIES METHODS AND MODELS
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dNicholas Santos, Center for Watershed Sciences, UC Davis
"A System for Managing, Mapping, and Understanding Species Range Information"

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT:

The decline of species worldwide is alarming and difficult to document due to a lack of reliable information on the geospatial extent and status of a given taxon. Freshwater habitats are disproportionately degraded globally with resultant declines in fish populations and subsequent retractions in biogeographic ranges. These challenges compound because aquatic taxa are inherently difficult to map. We addressed this problem for California freshwater fishes by developing the software and database known as PISCES, which is a set of ArcGIS tools written in Python for managing species range information. PISCES captures, stores, maps, and reports on the spatial and temporal dynamics of targeted species by using standard spatial units to track species and meet natural resource management objectives. PISCES contains 317,225 records for all 133 native California fish taxa and 41 nonnative taxa. These data are quality controlled to produce accurate range maps on fish species in California. PISCES robustly tracks metadata and provides thorough metadata of its own. PISCES further contains a new open source library used to write metadata, bridging a functional gap in ArcGIS? Python library by enabling general purpose access to layer metadata. Although PISCES is currently used for inventory and mapping of California freshwater fish species, the underlying framework is agnostic to taxonomy or spatial domain, allowing others to adapt the tools for new conservation efforts."

 

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dJim Graham, Humboldt State Unviersity
Modeling Uncertainty in Habitat Suitability Models with HEMI 2"d


SCGIS Profile


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ABSTRACT:

"The Hyper-Envelope Modeling Interface, version 2 (HEMI 2) is a new software tool that has been created by Dr. Jim Graham to create habitat suitability models (HSMs) which can be used to predict potential species distributions. Existing methods for creating HSMs have shortcomings including; overfitting of data, inability to predict habitat without complete data sets, and a lack of uncertainty analysis. HEMI 2 overcomes these drawbacks by; limiting the complexity of the models, allowing expert opinion to be combined with field data to create models, allowing the modeling of uncertainty in HSMs based on the error inherent in data sets. This enables researchers to create more robust predictions of potential species distributions based on global change and specifically climate change."

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dAdam Alsamadisi, University of Tennessee Knoxville
"Using Monte Carlo simulations to Compare Limiting Habitat Factors and Estimate Uncertainty of Suitable Habitat Area Determined by Expert-Based Habitat Models for Red Wolves (Canis rufus) in South Carolina, West Virginia, and Arkansas"

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT:

"Red wolves ( Canis rufus ) were declared extinct in the wild in 1980, and for 25 years the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has managed a reintroduced population of the species in northeastern North Carolina. Although the initiative has been successful in increasing the population, recovery efforts have been limited by several anthropogenic and environmental stressors, which prompted this study to explore alternative sites that might be considered for future red wolf reintroduction projects. Using a weighted overlay approach, an expert-based habitat suitability model was constructed to determine the area of suitable habitat for red wolves in three states within the historic range of the species: South Carolina, Arkansas, and West Virginia. The uncertainty of these models (specifically, the uncertainty of the models attributed to uncertainty in the habitat suitability of the input variables) was then quantified using Monte Carlo simulations. By performing this analysis in these three study sites, we determined which habitat variables were the most significant limiting factors and most contributed to varying results among the three states."


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CONSERVATION APPS
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dDr. Tosha Comendant Conservation Biology Institute, US
"Engaging stakeholders and informing adaptive landscape conservation and resource management with mapping platforms, portals, and viewers"d


SCGIS Profile


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ABSTRACT:

"Conservation programs or projects ranging from single species efforts to large geographic landscapes are increasingly complex and often involve multiple organizations and jurisdictions. Potential stakeholders may include researchers, policy makers, managers, field staff, special interest groups, and the public. Increased levels of coordination and collaboration are needed to utilize complex scientific inputs and to navigate extensive laws, regulations, and policies. As a result, it has become increasingly important to facilitate and foster partnerships, coordinate conservation planning, and share of best practices across multiple organizations and increased spatial scales. Here, we provide examples and lessons learned from the development of an open-access, geospatial platform called Data Basin. This resource supports projects with a broad range of stakeholders who need to visualize and collaborate using spatial data. These custom portals are supporting activities of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, a multi-stakeholder national network collaborative, and the public engagement components of large scale planning projects like the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan. We will share how the platform, customized portals, and viewers facilitate a range of research, assessments, planning, and stakeholder engagement in conservation projects and programs. "

 

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dJanet Silbernagel, University of Wisconsin-Madison
“Capturing Change in Place: Geotools for Citizen Engagement and Adaptive Design”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT:


"We have designed a suite of integrated mobile- and web-based applications, known as Geotools, for constructing place-based narratives. The geotools allow citizens to create, map, and share spatially defined multimedia observations of their local environment. These tools integrate three exploding technologies: smart, location-based apps, narrative in science, and mapping in the cloud, in ways that enrich the analytical power of GIS and contribute to design of adaptation strategies. By collecting local place-based knowledge around specific topics, geotools leverage technology to amplify human capabilities to map, monitor and adapt our response to future environmental situations. The Esri Application Prototype Lab (APL) helped conceive and code the geotools suite, which consist of custom web storymaps and mobile apps, built on an ArcGIS.com framework. We then piloted the geotools suite through a study with Great Lakes coastal communities to evaluate citizen engagement in coastal conservation. Here we showcase observations and results from the pilot study. From this, we see several emerging applications for integrating the geotool technology in ways that can transform citizen science into a smarter system for capturing local environmental change and designing adaptation strategies through crowd-sourced observations."

 

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dPete Kauhanen, San Francisco Estuary Institute
“Green Plan IT: Green Infrastructure Siting, Modeling, Optimization and Tracking ”

SCGIS Profiled - none

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ABSTRACT:

"Addressing stormwater runoff and pollution challenges associated with urbanization is complex and relies on costly engineering, especially in highly-developed urban environments. Increasingly, distributed management of stormwater runoff using Green infrastructure (GI) is emerging as a multi-benefit solution that can address stormwater quality and quantity concerns. GreenPlan-IT, a watershed planning level tool, was developed to support the cost-effective selection and placement of GI in urban watersheds. The GreenPlan-IT ToolKit contains three Modules: a GIS-based Site Locator Tool, a Modeling Tool, and an Optimization Tool. The Site Locator Tool works with ESRI software to produce customizable and useful planning-level maps that identify and rank locations to implement GI. The Modeling Tool is built on a hydrologic and water quality model to establish baseline conditions; identify high-yield runoff and pollution areas; and quantify any reduction made from GI implementation. The Optimization Tool was developed to determine GI scenarios that minimize the total implementation cost while satisfying water quality and quantity objectives and constraints. The GreenPlan-IT Toolkit has been piloted in and is currently being used in numerous SF Bay Area municipalities. The toolkit is being further improved and a Tracking Tool is being added. The toolkit combines the best available science with the best available local and regional data and can be applied to areas throughout the region."

 

 

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MARINE BIODIVERSITY
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dSherilyn Tan, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore"
“Mapping Scleractinian Coral Communities of Singapore using the Geographic Information Systems (GIS)”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT:

"The scleractinian reef communities located south of Singapore mainland were studied using Line Intercept Transact. Altogether 118 sites (44 reefs) accounting for a total of 11.9 km of reefs were surveyed. Results indicate that high species diversity still exists in Singapore, with a total of 53 genera of hard corals representing 17 families and 141 species (including non-scleractinian reef-building Heliopora sp. and Tubipora sp. ) documented. Live coral cover at the reef crest was found to fluctuate widely between reefs, ranging from 4.47% to 78.71%. About 63% of the 118 transacts showed live coral cover of > 30%. Diversity indices, species evenness and abundance measures were used to determine the ecological state of the reefs, and results were incorporated into a GIS basemap. Multivariate nMDS ordination indicated a loose clustering of the reefs into four main groups with similar scleractinian coral assemblages. Human activities in the area around the reefs were also mapped to assess their impacts on the reefs. Spatial analysis highlighted a possible link between anthropogenic activities and diversity, evenness and coral abundance indices. The preliminary GIS basemap in this current study is a first for Singapore, and one of the most direct and useful applications is establishing linkages between mapped variables. As more data from future research is incorporated, this basemap could be a useful tool for management decisions on conservation and development . "

 

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d#Francoise Cabada Blanco, Laboratorio de Conservación Marino-Costera, Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela. "Exposure of the threatened pillar coral´s habitat to local stressors at Los Roques National Park, South Caribbean: evidence of non-compliance"

SCGIS Scholar Profile

SCGIS Profile
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ABSTRACT:

I evaluate the effectiveness of the current National Park use zoning to ensure the representativeness and protection of the pillar coral populations, and propose alternative spatial plans based on bio-ecological and socioeconomic data to ameliorate threats and increase coral reefs resilience. Spatial analyses between four information layers were performed. They included: 1) the National Park zoning, 2) species presence/absence and abundance 3) habitat characteristics and health status, and 4) a “threat-risk” index, developed from in-site bio-ecological data and current threats identified from questionnaires and interviews to key stakeholders. Sites with higher abundances of the pillar coral coincided with higher levels of protection among zones of the National Park. However, tourism-related stakeholders and fishermen don’t comply with the zonation. This reflects on the habitat health status and threat-risk index, highlighting the need of implementing new planning strategies under the real enforcement capacity of the Park´s authorities. These results are the first attempt to evaluate the “conservation effectiveness” of a MPA in Venezuela, focusing on coral reefs and threaten coral species, offering a baseline for more comprehensive planning strategies that include underwater habitats as priority ecosystems due to their prime importance for the maintenance of biodiversity.

 

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Emma Accorsi and Maria Lopez-Pena, NASA
“Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Detect, Monitor and Respond to Unprecedented Levels of Sargassum in the Caribbean Sea"

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: none

 

 

 

 



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GIS METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
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dAimee Fitzgerald
“Implementing GIS Practices in Evaluating Human Well-being Surrounding Gold Mines”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT:

"GIS is an invaluable asset to the gold mining industry when monitoring the impact a potential site has on the well-being of the environment and the waterways in which it surrounds. Satellite imagery as well as topographic maps are all utilized when determining water sheds and habitats that could be impacted by the presence of a mine. It is widely known that there are a variety of methods with which the mining industry implements to monitor environmental impacts that contribute to climate change, such as baseline studies on waterways that are continuously censored to determine elevated chemical presence. Animal life and the habitats in which they reside undergo meticulous study to ensure regions remain unharmed; it is through the use of satellite mapping that such habitats are able to be located and explored thoroughly. With an ever mounting pressure to monitor and ensure that climate and the future of water remains uncompromised, why is it that the impact of such changes on the surrounding communities is virtually unaccounted for. It is important to implement the same GIS practices to monitor the effect climate change and possible contaminants in water have on the human life surrounding such hazardous sites. Mapping as well as screening the local populations for possible pathogens caused by pollutants would be undeniably beneficial in tracking just how harmful changes to our environment truly are. "

 

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LARGE MARINE ANIMALS AND APEX PREDATORS, FROM WHALES TO SHARKS

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dKeith May, Deep Blue Conservancy
“Acoustical Understandings Related to Overlapping Whale Migrations”

ABSTRACT:

"There is a song in the ocean, it is the song of the Humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ). It is a voice and guidance for survival in ways that continue to reveal themselves. There is a link between humanity and interspecies conversations if we listen and document the usage of space and time in proving that they life in a forth dimensional world. GIS has allowed us to visualize, analyze and understand acoustical data and whale vocalization collection as it relates to species survival and growth among whales. With specially created Kite Aerial Photography/Videography, we have discovered how the simple and complex part of this GIS data layering have become a new way of observing ocean life and the behaviors and life cycles of the Humpback whale and have been able to document sound, location and coastal environments as a source of overlapping migrations. The adaptations are undeniable and the empirical data of human relationships with show the tenuous relationships that alter migratory patterns."

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dHannah Calich, (student paper)
“Quantifying Habitat Use of Predatory Sharks in the Atlantic Ocean”

ABSTRACT:

" Great hammerhead, tiger, and bull sharks are either threatened with extinction or vulnerable to exploitation due to interactions with fisheries. Identifying critical habitats of these species can help wildlife managers implement regulations to reduce shark interactions with fishing gear. ArcGIS was used to analyze data from over 100 great hammerhead, tiger, and bull sharks instrumented with satellite tags in the Western Atlantic Ocean. Using these data, we identified shark distribution patterns and correlated them with remotely sensed environmental data (e.g., temperature, depth). Habitat suitability models were generated for each species in this analysis then overlapped with data on regional fishing intensity. This permitted us to identify areas and times where these sharks were vulnerable to fisheries interactions.

 

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TECHNOLOGY TRACK THURSDAY (chapel): NEW IDEAS SHOWCASE

NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONSERVATION SHOWCASE
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Paul Aarseth .
Vulcan, Inc "“Wildlife Conservation using Autonomous Drones”

SCGIS Profile none d


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ABSTRACT: "Elephants are being killed on African game reserves at alarming rates. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have been proposed as solutions to this crisis, but in practice, they typically take significant manpower and resources to be utilized effectively. We describe the first fully autonomous UAV solution designed specifically for wildlife conservation. We show that advances in computer vision and artificial intelligence can be used to launch drones, analyze video, and dispatch resources autonomously. We have developed a fixed-wing drone that uses on-board computing to recognize animals and threats and respond intelligently. We use a convolutional neural network running on a mobile GPU chip to detect objects in images (elephants, people, vehicles). This data feeds into an autonomous flight control system we call Flight Director (FD). FD validates a positive sighting by making sure the target object is seen in a number of successive frames around the same coordinates; it also decides what action to take after an object is positively identified. When the system identifies an elephant, the GPS position of the object is recorded, but if FD identifies something else (e.g., human, vehicle) it can send the images back to a base station for human analysis while continuing to track the objects. Having the intelligence on-board the drone reduces operator involvement and monitoring equipment but more importantly expedites the response time to each imminent threat."

 

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Joel Masselink, Vulcan, Inc “Managing large-scale wildlife survey data with GIS"

SCGIS Profiled

Presentation . (slides.com: opens new page, then use space bar to navigate thru the slides)

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ABSTRACT: "The Great Elephant Census provides accurate, current data regarding the population status of African savannah elephants. Since February 2014, parts of 20 countries have been surveyed to provide critical data for the most comprehensive assessment of the status and distribution of elephants to date. GIS has been instrumental in prioritizing surveys, data collection, standardization, validation, and for visualizing key results. We built a standardized geographic database which stores all survey data. GIS was used for managing and standardizing data related to survey flights, observations, and flight parameter data. Geography provides the structure for the GEC database. Data are organized via hierarchical, geographically distinct units. GIS provided tools to ensure data integrity, completeness, and organization. In addition to elephants and rhinos, many other large mammal species were recorded and their populations estimated. Geospatial analysis was used to determine the surveyed area and to convert from elephant observations to estimate population density. The GEC database allows opportunities to pursue more advanced analyses once all surveys are completed and results validated. In the future, the GEC database can be useful for wildlife conservation researchers to conduct detailed analysis on wildlife distribution, landscape ecology, and community ecology. The GEC database template presents a data model for future aerial wildlife surveys. "

 

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Ryan Howell, (student paper) “Methods for Remote Sensing of Western Juniper”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: Encroachment of pinyon and juniper woodlands in western North America is considered detrimental due to its negative effects on ecohydrology, plant community structure, and soil stability. Management plans at the federal, state, and private level often include juniper removal for improving habitat of sensitive species and maintaining sustainable ecosystem processes. Changes in western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) cover was detected following juniper removal treatments between 1995 and 2011. Image classification was conducted using remotely sensed images taken at the Roaring Springs Ranch in southeastern Oregon. Feature Analyst for ArcGIS (feature extraction) and a supervised classification with ENVI 5.2 (pixel-based extraction) were used to delineate juniper canopy cover. Image classification accuracy was calculated using an Accuracy Assessment and Kappa Statistic. Preliminary results indicate a 66% decrease in juniper canopy cover using Feature Analyst compared to a 75% decrease in juniper using the supervised classification. A limitation to classification includes the challenge of accurately distinguishing juniper from other tree species in the 1995 panchromatic imagery. Poor image quality can also require higher resolution imagery to manually correct the resulting classification. The development of methods for detecting change in juniper cover can lead to more accurate and efficient data acquisition and subsequently improved land management and monitoring practices.

 

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DRONES/UAV FOR CONSERVATION
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Francis Hourigan (student paper) (no photos available)
“Mapping Invasive Plant Species in the Bay Area Using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).”

SCGIS Profiled

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ABSTRACT: ). Mapping wetland vegetation using remote sensing technologies, such as satellite and low flying aircraft imagery and Lidar, have been used extensively in the past decade. More recently, the increased affordability and widespread availability of drones also known as Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), has made environmental resource monitoring and conservation more efficient and cost effective. Using high spatial resolution imagery taken with a UAS, the extent of vegetation can be mapped at the peak of the growing season with centimeter accuracy. In addition, the recent release of ESRI Drone2Map (Beta) makes the imagery post-processing more streamlined and simplified for the average user. The combination of these tools and software will allow the high spatial and temporal resolution that can be acquired through the use of a UAS to be applied to conservation and restoration of native plant species and habitats more regularly. Specifically, the change detection or quantification of invasive and native plant species can be tracked overtime with the use of high spatial and temporal resolution UAS imagery. The potential uses for a UAS are just now starting to be explored especially for their application to conservation and restoration ecology. Potential applications and management recommendations are offered in this synthesis of the recent use of UAS technology and Imagery Classification of Invasive Species in the Bay Area.

 

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Sharon Dulava, (student paper) (no photos available)
“Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and fine-scale change detection for assessing reproductive status of colonial nesting waterbirds”


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ABSTRACT: Aerial photographic surveys from manned aircraft are commonly used to estimate the size of bird breeding colonies, but are rarely used to evaluate reproductive success. Recent technological advances have spurred interest in the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for monitoring wildlife. The ability to collect imagery at both high spatial and temporal resolutions while minimizing disturbance and safety risks make UAS particularly appealing for monitoring colonial nesting waterbirds. In addition, advances in photogrammetric and GIS software have allowed for more streamlined data processing and analysis. Using UAS imagery collected at Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge during the peak of the nesting bird season, we set out to evaluate the utility of UAS for monitoring and informing the reproductive biology of breeding American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos). By using fine-scale change detection with a multi-temporal nearest neighbor analysis, we were able to develop a rapid, accurate method to differentiate nesting from non-nesting individuals. Here, I will present the results of our work and discuss recommendations for planning and conducting colonial nesting waterbird surveys, and processing and evaluating the resulting imagery. Speaker Bio: Sharon Dulava is currently an MSc candidate in the Department of Wildlife at Humboldt State University, where she's studying the use of unmanned aircraft systems to map and monitor colonial nesting bird populations.

 

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Jeff Miller, GeoWing Mapping
“Tracking Marsh Vegetation Community Changes using UAV-Derived NIR Imagery

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Nate Corder, (Audio Only) (no photos available) " Using Remote Sensing to Monitor The Area of Lake Mead"

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ABSTRACT: Due to climate change, increased drought conditions, increasing population, and an already over allocated Colorado River System, lake levels at Lake Mead have been dropping considerably. This paper discusses how remote sensing was used to compare temporal differences in the area of Lake Mead. 1986 image data from Landsat 5 and the 2003 image data from Landsat 7 was obtained from USGS Earth Explorer. The data was processed using ENVI 32 Bit Classic software. The area of Lake Mead was digitized using supervised parallelepiped classification tools. Comparison of the lake area of the 1986 and 2003 images shows that between 1986 and 2003, the area of Lake Mead receded by approximately 179 square kilometers (~28%). U.S. Bureau of Reclamation records show that for the same period the lake area receded by 169 square kilometers (~28%). "

 

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ONLINE & COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT

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Donitza Ivanovich, “Incorporating GIS and Citizen Science in Education”

SCGIS Profile

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ABSTRACT:

"This study aims to assess student engagement with a variety geospatial technologies and a citizen science curriculum to develop lesson plans that incorporate student engagement, motivation, self-efficacy and knowledge in STEM with the influence of geospatial technologies. The field of Geographic Information Systems is closely knitted to STEM learning, spatial literacy, critical thinking making it desirable to include in the modern, digital classroom. However, many educators interested in using GIS as a curriculum enhancer are often overwhelmed by the broad, sophisticated field as well as the time and effort to learn new technology skills. I created, tested, and published a series of biology lesson plans based on the Lost Ladybug Citizen Science project. These lesson plans were based on surveys gauging student’s interest and engagement levels with various pedagogical tools within GIS as well as a learning and engagement assessment of the non-GIS Lost Ladybug Curriculum. Each of these lesson plans were tested in a series of science summer camps taught at the Museum of Northern Arizona. This study is profound as there is little empirically-based research on the measurable benefits of student intrinsic motivation and learning within individual facets of GIS pedagogical tools and learning techniques. The published lesson plans are modifiable, follow State Standards and are available for anyone to download."

 

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Patti Diaz, H2O Trash Patrol
“Conservation through Education & Recreation”

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ABSTRACT: "Building the connections of individual actions to ocean conservation is what nonprofit organization, H2O Trash Patrol is all about. Through the unique combination of recreation, education and technology, H2O has been expanding people's awareness of the problems facing the aquatic world. Along with volunteers, H2O utilizes paddleboarding as a means to travel deep into the hidden corners and otherwise unreachable waterways removing debris. In addition, new ways to reach the public were developed. Working in partnership with program originator Dean & Associates, the environmental education application, Where You Live Program was born. This unique program improves the public's understanding of how their actions can help protect their watersheds all the way to the Pacific Ocean. By leveraging ArcGIS mapping technologies, the application provides a virtual tour of used oil and debris traveling through storm water drainage paths as they traverse the hydrologic units and geographic features within the watersheds. In addition to tracing drainage routes, the tour includes informational pop-ups that highlight habitats and species of interest, and further demonstrates the impacts of storm water pollution on these sensitive ecosystems. Through the various platforms of outreach, H2O Trash Patrol in partnership with Dean & Associates have been successful in expanding environmental education in order the promote marine conservation and ocean stewardship."

 

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SESANGA COLLIN, Newplan Limited
“Save our world web app"

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ABSTRACT: Save our world is a web based application based on MySQL, PHP, JavaScript and Html that uses Google earth API to mark deforestation points, visualize the intensity of deforestation and also quantify it to provide authorities with a tool to better focus their resources. The application is accessible by the general public therefore it creates awareness to the general public in Uganda. The application provides spatial data about deforestation that has not previous been available in the country. It provides a sound basis to determine trends in deforestation over given periods of time."

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Carol Giffin, U.S. Geological Survey
“The National Map Communities of Use"

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TECHNOLOGY TRACK FRIDAY: REMOTE SENSING

RS AND NDVI FOR VEGETATION ASSESSMENT AND CHANGE DETECTION
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Chris Soulard, US Geological Survey
“Vegetation monitoring within meadows of the Sierra Nevada Mountains using a continuous Landsat TM time series”

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ABSTRACT: "Montane meadows are particularly sensitive to climatic, anthropogenic, and fire-driven changes. Researchers with USGS and UC Davis utilized the Google Earth Engine processing to evaluate meadow greenness continuously (every 16 days) from 1985 to 2012 with Landsat TM imagery to understand short- and long-term trends in meadow vegetation health in the Sierra Nevada. Landsat-derived vegetation indices (e.g., NDVI, EVI) were summarized for nearly 6,000 meadows across the Sierra Nevada. Vegetation conditions were evaluated by identifying the normal range in meadow greenness throughout the 37-year time series with deviations flagged as change events. Ancillary data including PRISM climate data, aerial photography, and spatially explicit fire data were examined to differentiate between event-driven disturbances and gradual changes in NDVI. Undisturbed meadows were used to determine the climatic variables contributing to variability in NDVI across the Sierra Nevada, while select meadows with fire-driven changes were used to evaluate post-fire NDVI effects. Non-uniformity in abiotic characteristics (e.g. geology, slope, etc.) as well as variability in climate and fire regimes on the landscape contribute to different NDVI patterns across the Sierra Nevada meadows. Our work helps identify select abiotic and climatic characteristics affecting meadow greenness, and leads to a greater understanding of how meadows respond to disturbances such as fire."

 

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Anderson Shepard, 2NDNATURE, LLC
“Using Landsat to Measure Conservation Effectiveness of Alpine Meadows”

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ABSTRACT: " In recent decades, natural resource management agencies have designed, implemented and managed a multitude of stream and floodplain restoration efforts to restore function and natural processes of alpine meadows throughout the Sierra Nevada. Quantifying the effectiveness of these actions is critical as managers strive to demonstrate environmental value for the investment and compete for scarce funding. Traditional methods for effectiveness assessments, namely the collection and analysis of long-term field datasets, are unwieldy due to their expense, their limited spatial and temporal application, their inherent sampling error, and the challenge of inconsistent pre and post restoration data. To address these shortcomings, we used GIS to analyze Landsat imagery from 1984 to the present and devised an NDVI-based methodology for assessing the effectiveness of past meadow restoration actions and for prioritizing sites for future projects. These GIS-based results are consistent with on-the-ground data, yet cost a fraction of the amount, repeatedly include comparable images for all areas of interest, and provide managers with clear data that can be easily integrated to address their planning, reporting and funding needs. With this presentation, the audience can expect to learn about how GIS and remote sensing can be used to investigate the interactions between meadow vegetation and its underlying hydro-geomorphic processes, and how an old dog (NDVI) can still perform new tricks.

 

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Sara A. Goeking, Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Forest Service
“A hydrology-dependent method for delineating potential riparian areas”

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ABSTRACT: Ecologically-based definitions of "riparian" typically include a hydrologic component, e.g., flood magnitude or frequency, yet most riparian delineation methods use only topography, existing vegetation, and/or channel proximity, and may not perform well across broad scales or diverse watersheds. The US Forest Service?s Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA) and Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC) collaborated to evaluate 3 dynamic methods for delineating potential riparian areas: an existing valley confinement algorithm; a cost-distance method based on fixed, user-defined heights above river channel; and a cost-distance method based on flood heights for user-defined flood recurrence intervals, e.g., 100-yr floods, based on USGS stage-discharge equations at gage sites. All three methods use digital elevation models and National Hydrography Dataset flowlines as inputs; additional inputs vary among the three methods. Methods were tested in two basins that differ with respect to gradient and degree of valley confinement: Utah's Duchesne River Basin, and the Nebraska portion of the Middle Republican River Basin. Evaluation criteria included each method?s inputs, output, complexity, flexibility, sensitivity, and scalability. The third method ? using USGS data to calibrate height differences between steams channels and riparian surfaces ? was recommended as the most scalable and versatile. Because this method delineates potential rather than actual riparian vegetation, it can be applied at broad scales to create focused areas of interest, within which users may further distinguish existing riparian vegetation from potential riparian restoration sites."

 

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dArmando Rivera & dSabin Dhital, (student paper)
“Monoculture influence in Land Surface Change of Pindal, Ecuador”

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ABSTRACT: " Monoculture production has been affecting the remote region of Pindal in the south of Ecuador. The main production of maize with uncontrolled use of fertilizers and agrochemicals have transformed the landscape of the region with a notable reduction of natural vegetation. Landsat Imagery and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index methods allowed to determine vegetation cover changes in the last decade. Satellite images from June and October from 1991, 2001 and 2013 were used to predict changes in different seasons. The results found that agricultural area has increased from 51.80% to 59.57%, built up and barren land which includes urbanization areas has been increasing from 12.83% to 19.08 %. On the contrary, natural vegetation has been decreasing from 24.43% to 19.08 %. The results obtained during the analysis permitted to determine a considerable change from 1991 to 2001, when the agricultural area increased, in decrement of barren area. This behaviour was associated to the events occurred in 2000 when the maize monoculture was implemented as the only economical source and its high production was associated to the use of agrochemicals. In 2013 the agricultural area seems to be reduced again. In this year was evident that the barren areas increased, showing that the effects of the strong dependant of the production of maize were associated to the erosion and degradation of the soil, which lost the agricultural capacity.

 

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RS methods for SNOW ASSESMENT, LAND COVER and HABITAT
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d #Tomomi Kudo, EnVision Conservation Office, Japan
“Seasonal Migration Routes of Sika Deer and the Importance of GPS Data ”

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ABSTRACT: Sika deer inhabit Hokkaido. Recently, it has been proven that an increase in population size influence the environment in number of ways. The Ministry of the Environment have fitted a number of Sika deer with GPS collars in a number of locations in Hokkaido, clarifying movement patterns. Almost all Sika deer move between summer and winter ranges. Seasonal migration patterns are influenced by forest area or not. GPS Data were used to figure out migration routes and what areas they use..

 

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Zachary Silber-Coats, Silber-Coats Consulting USA
“Satellite Snow Monitoring Methods in the Scott River Watershed”

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ABSTRACT: "The Scott River Watershed (SRW) is located in northern California. Streamflow in the SRW is dependent upon snowmelt. The purpose of this study is to assess remote sensing methods to estimate snow-covered area (SCA) in the SRW. SCA estimates are key inputs in watershed models, and time series of SCA can be used to analyze climate change. I used Landsat imagery to estimate SCA in the SRW during three non-consecutive water years (WY): 2002 (Landsat 7), 2010 (Landsat 5), and 2014 (Landsat 8). Images were topographically corrected using the Minnaert method in R, to minimize shadows and scattered light over rugged terrain. SCA was detected using a modification of the SNOWMAP method, which uses thresholds of the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI), and of near-infrared reflectance, to find SCA. An unsupervised classification of forest was used alongside NDSI values to detect additional SCA. Accuracy was evaluated using up to six snow courses present in the SRW. Initial results suggest that this method has potential to map SCA in the SRW, but chosen methods appear to estimate SCA conservatively. This is likely due to the threshold value of NDSI, which classifies pixels as SCA only where >50% of subpixel area is snow. This study has applications in hydrologic modeling where streamflow is dominated by snowmelt. SCA time series analysis also shows promise in climate change research at a much finer spatial scale than available in global or regional climate models."

 

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Kishwar Ali, Salford University UK

"Using Multiple Phyto-ecological indices and GIS techniques to understand the conservation status of biodiversity of the Hindukush ranges of Swat, Pakistan”:

ABSTRACT: The preliminary requirement of conservation ecology is the exploration of the natural vegetation, identification and quantification. Swat District, located in the Hindukush ranges, is considered as one of the most important biodiversity hotspot being severely affected by the anthropogenic activities. In order to explore the present floral diversity in the region, vegetation sampling was carried out at twenty-three different locations in the area. Various GIS techniques, i.e. spatial analysis, hotspot analysis, and NDVI were applied using remotely sensed data. Phyto-ecological indices and multivariate approaches were also used to further biodiversity analysis simultaneously with Maxent niche climate change modelling. We identified from the results obtained from GIS raster maps and biodiversity indices some distinct vegetation structures within the study area and thus can confirm the presence of microclimatic niches in the Swat district. Based on the results, it was concluded that the vegetation of district Swat is severely affected by human intervention and there is an urgent need to take initiatives. The recommended initiatives may include the introduction of new technologies e.g. GIS and remote sensing to study these changes, formulating new and effective trespassing laws, mobilizing and finally, educating the local community to enhance the conservation structure of the valley by providing better opportunities for ecotourism and protecting the important flora and fauna."

 

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RS for DEFORESTATION AND REFORESTATION
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dMayerling Sanabria Buitrago, " Universidad De La Salle (Prior Scholar)
“Identification Of Areas To Connectivity Forest In A Cundinamarca Area Through Satellite Image Interpretation.”

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"Deforestation is a process that affects an ecosystem structure and function. The parameter most affected by deforestation is coverage. For example, coverage reduction causes problems such as water cycle changes, regional changes in temperature and precipitation regimes, reduction in carbon dioxide sequestration, loss of habitats, and fragmentation of ecosystems. For the Department of Cundinamarca is important to identify potential areas to develop reforestation projects that allow to connect existing forest patches in the region. his because there are no precise figures on the extent and location of the forest cover. Prioritization of areas for forestry conservation and production projects was possible through image interpretation and GIS analysis. In this process was necessary firstly, a spectral interpretation of Landsat images available, and after to use in ArcMAP Vector-based Landscape Analysis Tools V-Late for ArcGIS. with this process it was possible obtain the most common metrics to cover basic ecological and structure to land cover. with the presentation of this project, it?s possible to show at audience an agile and accurate to invest economic resources in the recovery of areas of connectivity. With this actions is possible to counteract the effects of climate change on regions with potential forest."

 

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d #Ricardo Sandí Sagot,Organization for tropical studies, La Selva, Costa . "Land use monitoring based on GIS techniques as resource for tropical Forest conservation in Costa Rica

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ABSTRACT:

From a monitoring perspective the use of remote sensing and GIS technologies has developed the capability of interpretation, quantification and planning, deriving variables in terms of incorporating more environmental analysis methods. Specifically here it’s introduced and discussed the case of an analysis ran for a Landsat ETM + 2014 image of north Atlantic Costa Rica where you can perceived severe land exploitation for monocrops covering large areas which shows inequalities for the sustainable land management and planning of the region. Apart from the derived results, this study also shows the potentiality of remote sensing and GIS techniques for the analysis of land use patterns.

 

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d#Phien Sayon, Wildlife Conservation Society,Cambodia
“The roles of GIS and Remote Sensing in conservation in Cambodia”

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National development plan, economic growth, social poverty, agricultural land expansion and people’s landlessness puts conservation areas in Cambodia in danger. Deforestation and land clearance are the main threats that need to be monitored. We are using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing, two very powerful tools, to monitor the land-use change in protected areas, to map where the hot spots of illegal activity are, to analyses how they are affected, and to identify places to take rapid action. Because of competing land requirements, most conservation areas in Cambodia have been reduced in size by excising land for urbanization, settlement, and agriculture and converted for economic development purposes. GIS and Remote Sensing can detect the areas where land has been grabbed or cleared illegally, which may have been granted to companies or individuals and can provide an alarm quickly on time to Protected Areas Managers and law enforcement teams to take action against illegal development and unplanned deforestation. We have also been able to prevent or change the boundaries of economic land concessions that infringe upon protected areas through our GIS and remove sensing work and providing the results to government decision makers to take action. GIS and remote sensing also provides a very visual opportunity to share information about the impact and danger of these practices to all stakeholders. GIS and Remote Sensing is a crucial tool for Conservation in Cambodia. Keywords: GIS, Remote Sensing, Land-use Monitoring, Conservation, Cambodia

 

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d#Sergei Rusetski, Institute of experimental botany of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. "Dynamics and development forecast old-growth broadleaf forests of Belovezhskaya Puscha National Park

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ABSTRACT:

The paper presents the results of studying the dynamics of old-growth broadleaf forests Belovezhskaya Puscha National Park, based on a comparison of the materials of forest inventory in 1962 and 2005. Based on the patterns identified in the analysis, build a forecast of old-growth broadleaf forests to 2050.

 

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RS FOR ASSESSING MANGROVES AND INVASIVES
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d#Andina Anastasia Krey, USAID (United States Agency for International Development) Lestari, Indonesia
“Mapping spatial distribution of mangrove species using high resolution multispectral data”

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ABSTRACT:

Mangrove forests provide crucial habitat for numerous organisms and play an important role in stabilising the global climate. Despite their importance, the area of mangrove continues to decline worldwide. Local scale assessment of forest structure and species composition is essential for mangrove conservation and management. Remote sensing techniques are widely and successfully used for monitoring the extent of mangrove forests given the challenges of access and coverage. Nonetheless, efforts to distinguish species within the mangrove forests often remain unsatisfactory. Remote sensing technology continues to improve, providing higher resolution (spectrally and spatially) and new opportunities. This study applied a supervised classification data processing technique to ADS40 multispectral data acquired at a spatial resolution of 50 cm with the aim of mapping mangrove species across a sub-tropical mangrove ecosystem. The accuracy of this technique was assessed for a) differentiating mangrove vegetation from terrestrial vegetation, b) mapping mangrove species composition. Field observations of species, basal area, stem density and tree height were recorded within a fringing mangrove forest bordering the Richmond River, NSW, Australia, and used to explore the accuracy of the remote sensing derived map output. The classified map achieved 75% overall accuracy in differentiating mangrove from other vegetation, and 64% overall accuracy in mapping the dominant mangrove species within the forests (Avicennia marina and Aegiceras corniculatum). We suggest that spectral resolution plays a more important role than spatial resolution when differentiating species by supervised classification in mangrove forest.

 

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d#Zouh Tem Isabella, Cameroon National REDD+,Cameroon
“Vegetation cover change of mangroves linked to species zonation pattern; case of Douala- Manoka, Cameroon”

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ABSTRACT:

Landsat satellite imageries was used to map changes within mangrove zonation that identified and described hydrological and vegetation cover changes in mangroves in the Douala Manoka estuary in Cameroon linked to species zonation patterns. Specifically, the time series data for the sites (Douala-Edea: Mbiako to Manoka;) was produced with an analysis of seaward edge of mangrove areas to show important trends. Desktop studies were applied to estimate overall changes in mangroves seaward and landward migratory trends over time using landsat images from 1975 to 2009, supplemented by ground truth data collected in 2010 in the mangroves zone. Overlay methodology provided useful information about changes in disappearing islands in terms of occupied surface areas in hectares in the investigated landsat image years, historical site of Mirando showed that between 1975 and 1986, this structure was terrestrial meanwhile by the year 2000, the structure has been engulfed by water. Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) methodology was useful in estimating at different location of interest general tread and overall movement of the landward or seaward migration over time. Local population were interviewed in the field and their superstitions above marine mammal causing flooding due to annoyance with the people were captured.

 

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Brian Shepard, Clean Water Services
“Online Data Collaboration for Large Scale Habitat Enhancement”

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ABSTRACT:

"Leveraging a number of online technologies, Clean Water Services has partnered with dozens of organizations to plant over 4.5 million plants and enhance more than 6,000 acres of riparian habitat on over 100 miles of streams in the Tualatin River Watershed. Our partnerships include regional and local governments, non-profits, and private landowners. Working with all of these partners and planting several million plants over the past decade has generated a tremendous amount of spatial data. Transitioning to online technologies was necessary to keep up with that volume of data. We?ve replaced paper maps and data collection sheets with iPads using ESRI Collector and custom applications that provide real time data for invasive species treatment and vegetation monitoring. We?ve streamlined Excel and Oracle based plant tracking with a single web based system of record. SharePoint Online allows us to track a number of collaborative projects with the local Soil and Water Conservation District. We?re using ArcGIS Online with an Organizational Subscription to collaborate with our partners on projects throughout the 700 square mile watershed. Project locations and sub-basin statistics are available to provide context on the amount of land covered by agriculture, development, public lands, and high value habitat. Habitat connectivity, site prioritization, and collaboration opportunity have been facilitated by providing online access to these datasets."

 

 

Copyright © ESRI and each respective author/contributor listed herein.
compilation : Charles Convis, ESRI Conservation Program, May 2007 & 2016
Send your comments to: ecp2 at esri dot com