SCGIS 2014 Scholarship Program        (2014 main page)

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Here you will find information about our 2014 scholars. This group is selected by our chapters in 10 countries and regions around the world. We encourage all SCGIS members to find candidates doing work or needing help relevant to what you do, and to reach out and contact them, introduce yourself, see how you can help them. Those wishing to donate can do so at the official SCGIS site.

 

Alejandra Betancourt Rial, Institute of Envirl and Ecol Sciences (ICAE), Venezuela
Alejandro Rubén Vila, Wildlife Conservation Society, Chile
Alphonce Blass Mallya, The Nature Conservancy, Tanzania
Evgeny Egidarev, World Wildlife Fund, Russia
Griffin Kaize Shanungu, Zambia Wildlife Authority, Zambia
Hariyawan Agung Wahyudi, HarimauKita - Sumatran Tiger Cons Forum, Indonesia
Irina Danilova, Transparent World, Russia
Lara Heidel, Wildlife Conservation Society, Argentina
Laura Rodríguez Yakisich, Moises Bertoni Foundation, Paraguay
Oldy Arnoldy Arby, Forum Tata Ruang, Indonesia
Pablo Lacabana, Centro de Estud de Ambiente Economía y Sociedad, Venezuela
Pascal Nalimanana Rabeson, Centre ValBio/Inst for Cons of Trop Env, Madagascar
Rangikauhoe Markus Heke, Nga Whenua Rahui, New Zealand
Solofo Eric Rakotoarisoa, Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre, Madagascar
Stuart Fulton: Comunidad y Biodiversidad A.C., Mexico




Svetlana Vynokurova, Azov-Black Sea Ornithological Station, Ukraine
Tatenda Noreen Muchopa, Painted Dog Research Trust, Zimbabwe
Tomaž Šturm, Slovenia Forest Service, Slovenia
Tomonobu Akiyama, Field Egg, Japan
Tuguldur Enkhtsetseg, The Nature Conservancy, Mongolia
Yamil Edgardo Di Blanco, Asn civil Centro de Investig del Bosque Atlántico (CeIBA), Argentina
z Carlos Ignacio Roesler Lab of Animal Ecology and Behavior, Buenos Aires U, Argentina
z Estefanía Medina Bastarrachea, Comis Nacional de Áreas Natural Proteg (CONANP).
. . . Dirección Regional Península de Yucatán y caribe Mexicano, Mexico
z Gabriela G Nava Martinez, Oceanus A.C., Mexico
z Yelba del Carmen Flores Meza Cent Recursos Acuáticos de Nicaragua. U Nacional Nicaragua


Alejandra Betancourt Rial, dVenezuela
*-Alejandra Betancourt Rial, Institute of Environmental and Ecological Sciences (ICAE), Venezuela
-Organization name: Project ECOMAP_CC (Ecoregions Landscapes and Ecosystems of Venezuela. Analysis of vegetation as a result of climate change). Affiliated to the Institute of Environmental and Ecological Sciences (ICAE) belonging to the University of Los Andes. Mérida, Venezuela.
-Organization full street address: Unisersity of Los Andes (RIF: G-200000-40-6), Faculty of Science, third floor, Institute of Environmental and Ecological Sciences (ICAE), Mérida Venezuela
-Organization full mailing address: Unisersity of Los Andes (RIF: G-200000-40-6), Faculty of Science, third floor, Institute of Environmental and Ecological Sciences (ICAE), Mérida Venezuela
-Country: Venezuela
-Work phone with country and area code: 0058 274 2401255
-Work Fax with country and area code: 0058 274 2401255
-Main email: eulogio@ula.ve
-Organization Web site URL if any: http://www.ciencias.ula.ve/icae/

-History: When I was younger who taught me the value of conserving nature and love was my family, my father was on a farm with cows and horses throughout childhood and my mother has always had a very kind heart and gentle with animals ( which explains why my house that is located in a fairly urban area are more pet and animals living than people). Growing up it's was time to be more serious about my future, and I take the example of my big sister that began studying biology and conservation, listening to her and seeing her doing internships and field studies convinced me to follow her footsteps. I had the grace to enter one of the top public universities in my country and begin my training as a biologist, ecologist and conservationist. Then I realized that the harsh reality of my country and the very difficult posibility to continue my passion. My sister had to leave the country in search of better opportunities and I had to fight hard to get a job inwhat makes me happy. When I got to the half of my career I met a few members of the institute ICAE whom were my teachers, after several practices and field training, I realized that I was in love with Ecology and it was not a reversible situation, and my life would be based on it for that moment on. Finally to finish my studies I had to do a special research job (tesis) for graduate in which my teacher Dr. Eulogio Chacón kindly offered to be my mentor and guide in this work and I began to learn about the GIS, in these programs I found a way to see the world from above, where many logistical problems in conservation could be solve, many economic problems of field surveys could be omitted. And although I did not tipically like computers, I got myself deep in the matter, until my elbows began to burn with the computer all day. At that time I had just discovered a tool that allowed me to do what I was passionate about.

-WHAT IS UNIQUE ABOUT YOUR WORK? One of the things that captivated me from the GIS is to appreciate all the things in a certain area you could never walk or have access to, wich is one of the reasons why I keep using the GIS. For my work as a consultant in the creation of the water fund, one of the benefits of using GIS constitutes the reason for my fascination with these programs. Watershed Mucujún River where I work, in a third of its area is occupied by areas without paths with breathtaking, spectacular, cold landscapes with a vegetation that seem from another planet, but thanks to these programs we can generate plans that can protect and preserve this areas, as each day we see how the anthropogenic border progresses leaving them more and more expose. One of the most serious problems in this project and one tat the GIS can not solve is the lack of information or the refusal of support from the state institutions, despite being an area that supplies water to 80 % the city of Mérida (Which has about 500,000 inhabitants) creating gaps in the results and idex of error. One problem that occurs very often, is that sometimes not knowing all the tools offered by GIS, the job becomes much denser and long

The research will be national and will be develop throughout the entire geography of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (terrestrial and marine areas). The coordination of the project will be at the ICAE institute in the University of Los Andes. In this project there will be also the involvement of independent consultants and other national institutions as the Ministry of Popular Power for the Environment (MPPA), The Nature Conservancy (TNC Venezuela), the Experimental University of Guayana (UNEG), Processing Center of Satellite Images (CPDI), Foundation Engineering Institute (FII), The University of Zulia (LUZ), the Simon Bolivar University (USB), the National Parks Institute (INPARQUES) and the Central University of Venezuela (UCV). The main objective of the project is mapping all the ecosystems of Venezuela, under an ecological approach to landscape, considering a nested hierarchy that allows subdividing the country in large ecoregions and landscapes, and analyzes the processes of ecosystem changes for effect of climate change during 2001 and 2011. It is a national project where communities, especially the rural and poor, participate as knowledgeable guides in the natural environment where they live, so that will be the contact point for the lifting of local information. In this sense they will be benefited to create a sense of environmental awareness. They are the key point for the transformation processes. The main benefit that will bring the fulfillment of the project objectives is the further use of the products obtained for conservation planning, land management, sustainable development plans, environmental impact assessment, analysis and modeling in climate change scenarios, monitoring and conservation.d

-Role in the organization: In the project ECOMAP_CC I am a research associate whose function is to assess changes in coverage that have occurred in recent years in the Caparo Forest Reserve, which is a national timber reserve historically hit hard. I was hired on this project by Dr. Eulogio Chacón (head of this national program), to create a window for the mapping of ecosystems in the country taking this reserve as a sample site.
The institute where this project runs is a great family who have given me the opportunity to work when I needed it, since half of my career about 5 years ago I know them and was Dr.Eulogio Chacón who hires me to work in a place that we knew little, but was in a serious trouble and threat of disappearing, and regrettably Caparo Forest Reserve located in the Edo Barinas is continuing in that direction.

In very few opportunities in my life I have been fortunate to travel to courses and workshops, where I can learn about conservation and also have other visions of work. Economically life has never been easy for me or my family, but I am very proud of it, because every day they get up to work even when his salary is extremely low and I want they feel the same for me. This training SCGIS was a great opportunity for someone who has little in her life, is a chance to continue to learn from the way my mentors have taught me, whit the practice, cultural exchange of ideas, fun and all that make a memorable learning experience, this is the way I was introduce in conservation planning. Participating in this training benefits not only me but all my colleagues because it is crucial for me to share the lessons learned from a group like yours.

*-Title of paper: ECOLOGICAL CORRIDORS AS STRATEGY FOR FOREST ECOSYSTEMS CONSERVATION OF THE CAPARO FOREST RESERVE, BARINAS STATE, VENEZUELA.
Alejandra Betancourt Rial y Eulogio Chacón-Moreno

ABSTRACT: Deforestation is causing a transformation of the landscape leading an ecosystem degradation and fragmentation, with the consequent loss of biodiversity. The semi-deciduous forests in the country are critically endangered and threat due to its intervention, including plant and animal species that inhabit these forests. A conservation proposal for forest ecosystems is presented in this paper, mainly focused on the semi-deciduous forests of the Caparo Forest Reserve, establishing preliminary ecological corridors to rescue biodiversity flows, assuming that the negative consequences that may have improved connectivity in patches, are despicable for being a forest that was connected 60 years ago. For the development of these corridors, was used as spatial basis, the distribution of all natural ecosystems and human intervention systems (Ecosystems Map). By satellite imagery analyzing and processing and GIS use, defined six ecological systems or ecosystems and four human intervention systems. The spatial arrangement of forest fragments was determined and the corridors as a conservation strategies were defined. Using ecological criteria, 66 links between patches of the original forest was proposed. With this strategy we are one step further towards the restoration of the forest in the reserve, with more biodiversity, with a healthy composition and structure maintained over time, in harmony with its inhabitants for the people of today and tomorrow.
Key words: fragmentation, semi-deciduous forest, ecosystems map, geographical information system, connectivity.

Alejandro Rubén Vila, Wildlife Conservation Society, Chile
*-Organization name: Wildlife Conservation Society Chile
*-Organization full street address (in your local format): Avda. General Bustamante 144, Of. 42, Providencia, Santiago, Chile
*-Organization full mailing address, if different: N/A
*-Country: Chile
*-Work phone with country and area code: 56-26351095
*-Work fax with country and area code: 56-22222697
*-Main email: wcschile@wcs.org
*-Organization Web site URL if any: http://www.karukinkanatural.cl/

history of your personal work in conservation and GIS:My first job in the conservation arena was at the Education dDepartment of Fundación Vida Silvestre Argentina (FVSA) in 1988. At the same time, and while still an undergraduate student, I volunteered in several WCS research projects studying sea lions, elephant seals and killer whales at Peninsula Valdes, Patagonia. In 1991 I received his Biology degree from the University of Buenos Aires, studying sea lions behavior. From 1993 through 1998 I coordinated the Pampas Grassland program for FVSA. While coordinating this program, I supervised park rangers, researchers, students, and volunteers working at Campos del Tuyú Reserve and Punta Rasa Biological Station, gathering information on the endangered pampas deer and migratory shorebirds. At that time I also worked closely with the government to establish a Ramsar Site in Samborombón Bay and participated actively in several actions for the conservation of coastal and marine areas, such as the Patagonian Coastal Zone Management Plan.
In 1999 I was appointed Coordinator of the Patagonian Forest Program in Argentina in a joint effort of FVSA and WWF. Over the next five years, I was in charge of binational efforts to identify priority areas for the conservation of biodiversity in the Southern Temperate Forest Ecoregion of Argentina and Chile. During this time, I also began to study the endangered Andean deer as a part-time researcher for WCS.
In 2004 I left FVSA to join WCS’s Southern Cone Program in Latin America as a field conservationist, working in terrestrial and marine issues for WCS Argentina and WCS Chile. As a field conservationist for WCS, I have lead research and exploration teams during the last fifteen years in Patagonia. From this position, I also conducted training courses on wildlife research, conservation and environmental education in close cooperation with government agencies and NGOs. I completed my PhD in Ecology at Buenos Aires University, studying pampas deer ecology, in 2006. From 2009 to 2013 I was appointed Marine Conservation Coordinator for WCS Chile. In 2013 I was appointed Conservation Coordinator for WCS Chile. My previous experience using GIS in conservation projects was mentioned above.

describe what is the most unique and the most challenging about the conservation/GIS work that you do: WCS has played a very active role in Chilean conservation in the past several years. Through its involvement in the establishment and current management of Karukinka, a private protected area in Tierra del Fuego, WCS has applied its scientific and policy capacity towards an area of very high conservation value at the southern tip of the continent. Karukinka constitutes the northern border of the Admiralty Sound, a bi-national watershed, unique for its biodiversity, and important for local activities like tourism and artisanal fisheries in southern Chile.

The Admiralty Sound is home to globally important marine wildlife, such as elephant, leopard and fur seals, Chilean dolphins, marine otters, Magellanic penguins, the only inland colony of black browed albatross in the world, and globally important fish and shellfish stocks, among others. The area is surrounded by spectacular mountain peaks, hanging valleys, waterfalls, fields of glaciers, and steep forested hillsides, which are protected by Alberto de Agostini National Park, managed by the Chilean National Forest Service (CONAF), and Karukinka. Such rich natural resources provide important benefits to the livelihoods of local people, such as sustaining artisanal fisheries and wildlife-based tourism. Although the Sound was included in the Cabo de Hornos Biosphere Reserve, this management category is not formally recognized by the Chilean government and, consequently, this “paper reserve” is not effectively protected.

Both the government and several independent studies have identified the Admiralty Sound as a priority target for marine conservation. However, the lack of any formal protection, associated management plans or guidelines to regulate tourism and fisheries in the Sound leave it vulnerable to the encroachment of coastal development that has challenged much of Chile’s northern waters. By promoting an Marine Protected Area (MPA) and a participative processes of coastal zoning as effective tools to organize fisheries and tours operating within Admiralty Sound we will reduce the existing threats.

Our challenge on the Admiralty Sound will contribute to an integrated model of MPAs in Chile, one that articulates terrestrial and marine conservation efforts, integrates public and private actors, and establishes a transboundary conservation approach. This model will provide tools to be used by the Government for implementing MPAs elsewhere in the rich and fragile coasts of Patagonia, and as a catalyst for advancing marine conservation along the entire Chilean coast.

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), founded in 1895, saves wildlife and wild places worldwide. We do so through science, global conservation, education, and the management of the world’s largest system of urban wildlife parks, led by the flagship Bronx Zoo. WCS conserves critical landscapes and seascapes by helping governments, national organizations, and communities establish and manage parks and protected areas, and integrate them with the complex matrix of surrounding land uses. WCS conducts more than 500 wildlife research and conservation projects in 60 countries, and is a leader in identifying local solutions to wildlife conservation challenges.

With over 40 years of continuous presence in the Patagonian region of Argentina and Chile, WCS has been at the heart of some of the greatest wildlife conservation achievements in the region. Working with national, regional, and local governments, the region’s scientists, and local communities, WCS generates knowledge for conservation, trains local researchers, builds public awareness, and creates and strengthens new protected areas. Our commitment to conservation in Patagonia is strengthened by the creation of a number of coastal and marine protected areas and stewardship of some of the most valuable conservation properties in the region: the 300,000 hectare flagship conservation reserve Karukinka, in Chilean Tierra del Fuego, and the two westernmost islands of the Falkland/Malvinas chain — Steeple Jason and Grand Jason.

In Tierra del Fuego lies one of the 75 Best of the Wild Sites of the Global WCS Portfolio: Karukinka, a magnificent reserve owned by WCS Chile, which shelters unique Patagonian landscapes and wildlife. Karukinka protects the largest intact stands of old growth lenga beech in the southern hemisphere. Its extensive peatlands are like miniature forests that shelter an incredible biodiversity and represent one of the most important wetlands in the world. These ecosystems serve as a globally important carbon storehouse and contribute to mitigate climate change effects.

From my position in WCS Chile (Director of Conservation), I am in charge of both research and educative efforts to conserve the biodiversity of southern Patagonia. I am leading a work team composed by young terrestrial and marine researchers, park rangers, and education specialists. I am also working in close cooperation with Chilean public services, other NGOs, and the academic sector. I devote a significant amount of time to maintain a participatory and positive relationship among institutions and members of several organizations.

*-Title of the paper you will present: The Admiralty Sound: An opportunity to integrate terrestrial and marine conservation efforts
*-Abstract/summary of the paper you will present: In this paper we present the participative process to promote a Marine Protected Area in Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia, Chile, as well as a preliminary zoning to minimize conflicts between existing human uses and conservation.


Alphonce Blass Mallya, The Nature Conservancy, Tanzania
Alphonce Mallyad
*-Organization name: The Nature Conservancy Africa program
*-Organization full street address (in your local format): Plot #16002 Mawalla Street
*-Organization full mailing address, if different: P. O. Box 13265 (Meru Branch), Arusha
*-Country: Tanzania
*-Work phone with country and area code: +255 732 979 681
*-Work fax with country and area code: N/A
*-Main email: amallya@tnc.org
*-Organization Web site URL if any: www.nature.org/africa

My involvement into conservation begun when I was young, my Dad was a hunter who used to bring home meat for barbeque from his hunting trips. Time lapsed and suddenly Dad was no longer bringing meat. As a young boy, I asked him how come his no longer travel and we no longer get bulks of meat at home. He sat me down and explained his concerns on the depletion of wildlife numbers where he used to hunt. He had made up his mind that he was no longer up for hunting. He began sharing stories on his trips out in the wilderness. I got impressed and was drawn into conservation from then. I and he fell into a hobby of watching wildlife films. I made up my mind that I wanted to be in conservation. I did my degree in Wildlife management, part of which had a month-long GIS training. This was my initial understanding on GIS and its roles in conservation. Later on, I joined The Nature Conservancy and worked as an administrator, a role that matured to my present, coordinating conservation practices. To me, Conservation comes as a hobby then a career. Understanding how GIS can improve our work on the ground made me pursue a deeper understanding on its applications and seek ways I can ably utilize it to advance conservation practices in Tanzania and Africa.

describe what is the most unique and the most challenging about the conservation/GIS work that you do: I work with a diverse of organizations from different backgrounds and interests. Some focus on agriculture, conservation, tourism, carbon credit,education, pastoralism/livestock keeping and traditional hunter gatherers to derive the best land use practice that sustains the livelihood of all. The area, covering about 35,000 km2 provides for some of the most iconic landscapes and resources such as the Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tarangire National Park, Lake Manyara National Park, Randilen community Wildlife management area, Enduimet Community Wildlife Management area and Makame Community Wildlife management area. Developing maps to fit this purpose is a unique challenge.

describe the work that your current organization does: In Northern Tanzania, The Nature Conservancy works through a collaborative effort with local organizations by facilitating sustainable rangeland management and natural resource conservation across the Northern Tanzania Rangelands. These areas are faced by increased pressure from population growth, competing land use interests and resource limitations, threaten the ecological integrity of the rangelands, and in turn, the benefits they provide to local communities and the national economy. We seek to achieve this by enhancing the integration of pastoralist and hunter-gatherer livelihood systems with the maintenance of key biodiversity and ecosystem services. The project aims to strengthen co-ordination, communication, information sharing and field-level collaboration amongst development, conservation, tourism and health care organisations in order to achieve whole system conservation.
In Western Tanzania The Nature Conservancy works in collaboration named Tuungane, a Kiswahili word meaning ‘let’s unite”. The Nature Conservancy has joined efforts with Frankfurt Zoological Society, Pathfinder International and Tanzania national Parks Authority to work with local people in enhancing the long-standing relationship between People and natural resources. The collaboration provides a holistic population, health and environment approach to provide sustainability in natural resources utilization for some of the most marginalized communities in East Africa.
In Zambia The Nature Conservancy is working with the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) and
other agencies, the Conservancy works to enhance resource protection, wildfire management, park infrastructure and share lessons learned from other work in southern and eastern Africa to improve community based natural resource management programs in the Mulobezi Game Management Area.
In Kenya, The Nature Conservancy is tackling some of Kenya’s most complex environmental and social challenges in its northern rangelands, the Tana River basin and along its northern coast. The Nature Conservancy works partners to improve conservation enabling policies and legal frameworks to help communities secure rights and effectively manage natural resources at local and national levels, to expand and perfect conservation practices to build resilient communities with strong local governance structures, diverse livelihoods and effective natural resources management programs, supports community-led efforts to protect endangered and threatened wildlife, such as elephants, black rhino and Hirola (Earth’s most endangered antelope), to secure their survival and established a Nairobi Water Fund to protect freshwater resources for nearly four million people in the city and generate economic, ecological and social benefits for the Tana River Basin’s up and downstream users.

My role is to coordinate conservation activities for our project areas in Africa.2014 is my fourth year working at The Nature Conservancy Africa Program. Previously I worked as an operations administrator, a role that got me to provide support on financial operations of The Nature Conservancy Africa Program. At present I am mainly focused on providing direct assistance to The Nature Conservancy’s Africa Program conservation Director, Providing field support to our work in Western and Northern Tanzania and minimum support to our Kenya and Zambia Programs. My support to Northern Tanzania project caters for 70% of my work time where I am working to establish a database for Northern Tanzania Rangelands Initiative partner organizations including gathering raw data and working with our USA-based employee to develop maps for improved decision making on the ground. I see my career growing to be able to provide more GIS support to the rest of our Africa Programs

*-Title of paper: The Northern Tanzania Rangelands Initiatived
*-Abstract:: Comprising roughly eight million acres, the northern rangelands cover the heart of Tanzania’s Great Rift Valley. These savannah rangelands are ecologically significant to migratory wildlife and are home to some of Africa’s most recognized landscapes – Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti, Tarangire and the Simanjiro Plains. With pastoralism as the dominant form of land use and central to the regional economy, the rangelands are also critical to supporting the livelihoods of resident pastoralists as well as small groups of hunter-gatherers such as the Hadzabe and Akie. However, increased pressure from population growth, competing land use interests and resource limitations, threaten the ecological integrity of the rangelands, and in turn, the benefits they provide to local communities and the national economy. Thus hunter-gatherer, pastoralist, tourism development and nature conservation interests share common challenges across this landscape arising from growing natural resource pressures.
In 2011, a number of development, social enterprise and conservation groups joined together to explore strategies for addressing these challenges and threats. The result was the beginning of the Northern Tanzania Rangelands Initiative (NTRI), which is a collaborative effort to achieve sustainable, local land use practices in order to safeguard the functioning of key ecosystems of northern Tanzania. The initiative seeks to achieve this by enhancing the integration of pastoralist and hunter-gatherer livelihood systems with the maintenance of key biodiversity and ecosystem services. The founding group includes The Nature Conservancy, Maliasili Initiatives, Wildlife Conservation Society and Dorobo Fund. NTRI aims to strengthen co-ordination, communication, information sharing and field-level collaboration amongst development, conservation, tourism and health care organisations in order to achieve whole system conservation. Member organisations complement each other, have a shared vision of success in the northern rangelands, share information, successes and failures, develop new interventions, raise funds, and increase awareness.

 

Evgeny Egidarev, World Wildlife Fund, Russiad
*-Organization name: WWF
*-Organization full street address (in your local format): Russia, 690003, Vladivostok ,Verkhneportovayast. 18a
*-Organization full mailing address, if different:
*-Country: Russia
*-Work phone with country and area code: +79242311633
*-Work fax with country and area code: +74232414863
*-Main email:egidarev@wwf.ru , egidarev@yandex.ru
*-Organization Web site URL if any: wwf.ru

Nature conservation became my primary interest during the last university years, when I became a member of druzhina (squad) of nature protection «Bars». Druzhina (volunteers group) was very effective in 3 main activities: environmental education, anti-poaching raids and scientific expeditions. After my graduation I decided to do my PHD in Pacific Geographic Institute of Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Science (PGI FEB RAS) and simultaneously worked for WWF (for more than 10 years now). Besides professional interest in the area of nature protection, I also have personal motives. I was born in the city next to the junction of two large rivers (Zeya and Bureya) and loved wild nature since I was a kid. My work now is to use all my knowledge to give our organization an edge in its work as a nature protector.

what is the most unique and the most challenging about the conservation/GIS work that you do: The most interesting part of my job is when quantity becomes quality. For example, when you compile a database for a certain region and acquire a lot of different materials (RS images, topographic ad thematic maps of different scale, statistics etc.) during their complex analysis you see a big picture of what is going on and see the problematic areas. The most important skill here is to identify the most important variables. One of the main problems of many GIS specialists is to arrange priorities correctly. Sometimes, because of the complicated calculations one can't see the main aim and instead of coming closer to the solution can be drawn away from it. In each GIS task you have to understand why you do it to use your working time effectively and achieve the goal. Thus, planning of nature protection activity in conjunction with GIS tasks becomes especially important.d

WWF is quite famous Profit Organizations engaged in conservation (http://wwf.ru/about/eng ). Amur branch of WWF-Russia conducts several main activities: biodiversity preservation, forest conservation, law enforcement, freshwater program, sustainable development and Protected Areas. Amur branch of WWF-Russia mainly deals with preservation of large cats, such as Amur Tiger and Far Eastern Leopard. It participates in collection and analysis of the data about these mammals (census, habitat change monitoring etc.). Also our organization tries to monitor forest sector development in the Far East (forest plantations, logging, fire monitoring, legislation improvement etc.). We also actively participate in creation of protected areas in the Far East of Russia. Freshwater programme encompasses large area - transboundary Amur river basin, which currently has a lot of ecological problems. Population increased drastically during XXth century and proportionally increased anthropogenic press, posing a threat to biodiversity. During passed years, millions of ha of wetlands (habitat of rare bird species) were lost, seafood resources depleted, water quality itself deteriorated. Hydrological regime is now distorted by Zeya and Bureya hydropower plants and several large dams erected on Sungari river in China. Here we work with stakeholders like state authorities and locals in order to find solutions to those issues. Russia is not the only country our office works in, we also cooperate with colleagues from neighboring China and Mongolia within the frame of different international agreements.

I work for WWF since 2002 and was at the source of first GIS projects here. Most of my working time now is devoted to fresh-water projects and the rest is shared by other activities WWF conducts. Cartographic analysis is my main responsibility. I also participate in preparation of materials for field works (maps for GPS and laptops for those working in the field, RS print outs) and analysis of the collected data (species distribution, logging activities, use of subsurface resources, new constructions etc.). I also provide GIS support for protected areas in the Far East. A lot of work has been done in 2008, when considerable amount of data was collected and processed during preparation of «Amur-Heilong River Basin Reader» book (http://wwf.ru/resources/publ/book/eng/299). My responsibility was to analyze possible scenarios that could be realized in case of different hydro power plants construction within Amur river basin. Also I analyzed the impact of gold extraction in Amur main tributaries. The result was a book called «Golden rivers. Issue 1. The Amur River Basin» d(http://wwf.ru/resources/publ/book/eng/686). I continuously cooperate with state and non-commercial organizations: zapovedniks (strict scientific nature reserve), national parks, regional PA administration, forest air-protection, hunting state department etc.

*-Paper Title: Basin (holistic) approach to the analysis of geo-ecological problems of Amur river.
*-Abstract: On the basis of cartographic information we have, we had made a holistic analysis of main natural objects state in the region and identified main threats to them. Results will be a fundament for a new conservation strategy for freshwater ecosystems for nature protection organizations. Strategy reflects main priorities and concrete actions, which will be supported in order to prevent environmental degradation in the region.

 

 

 


Griffin Kaize Shanungu, Zambia Wildlife Authority, Zambia


Hariyawan Agung Wahyudi, HarimauKita - Sumatran Tiger Cons Forum, Indonesia


Irina Danilova, Transparent World, Russia


Lara Heidel, Wildlife Conservation Society, Argentina


Laura Rodríguez Yakisich, Moises Bertoni Foundation, Paraguay


Oldy Arnoldy Arby, Forum Tata Ruang, Indonesia


Pablo Lacabana, Centro de Estud de Ambiente Economía y Sociedad, Venezuela


Pascal Nalimanana Rabeson, Centre ValBio/Inst for Cons of Trop Env, Madagascar


Rangikauhoe Markus Heke, Nga Whenua Rahui, New Zealand


Solofo Eric Rakotoarisoa, Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre, Madagascar


Stuart Fulton: Comunidad y Biodiversidad A.C., Mexico


Svetlana Vynokurova, Azov-Black Sea Ornithological Station, Ukraine


Tatenda Noreen Muchopa, Painted Dog Research Trust, Zimbabwe


Tomaž Šturm, Slovenia Forest Service, Slovenia


Tomonobu Akiyama, Field Egg, Japan


Tuguldur Enkhtsetseg, The Nature Conservancy, Mongolia


Yamil Edgardo Di Blanco, Asn civil Centro de Investig del Bosque Atlántico (CeIBA), Argentina


z Carlos Ignacio Roesler Lab of Animal Ecology and Behavior, Buenos Aires U, Argentina


z Estefanía Medina Bastarrachea, Comis Nacional de Áreas Natural Proteg (CONANP).
. . . Dirección Regional Península de Yucatán y caribe Mexicano, Mexico


z Gabriela G Nava Martinez, Oceanus A.C., Mexico


z Yelba del Carmen Flores Meza Cent Recursos Acuáticos de Nicaragua. U Nacional Nicaragua

 



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