ESRI Conservation & Climate Change Program, 2010

at the ESRI 2010 Int'l GIS User Conference, San Diego, July 12-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mahesh Pathak, survey of bank cutting at Jalad Khola, Nepal
Floorplan for 2010 Climate/Conservation Showcase
Click for full rez

For 2010 the Conservation & Climate Change area will move down to the main exhibit floor, right at the main Hall C entrance across from the bookstore (see inset map lower right) We will still have the same exhibitors and our own demo theater for presentations and talks including the SCGIS International Scholars (see numbered floor plan at right, exhibitor booth numbers and schedule below)

We will also be at the Monday Night Map Gallery opening in a special new "Citizen Science" poster area (see map below)

 

2010 Esri Conservation & Climate Area

General Hours
Monday 7/12      3:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
Tuesday 7/13      9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Wed       7/14      9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Thursday 7/15     9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

 

 


map
2010 Planet Action Program Poster (http://www.planet-action.org)

 

 

 

 


map

Location of Map Gallery Citizen Science Area.
Click for full rez

 

 

 

inset
Location Inset: 2010 Conservation/Climate Showcase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXHIBITOR FLOORPLAN LOCATIONS

Booth

Organization

Focus

Country

State/Province

848

Alaska Geographic

Climate Change

USA

Alaska

831

Arbonaut

Climate Change

Finland

 

1030

Birdlife International

Conservation

UK

 

725

Blue Raster

Climate Change

USA

Virginia

842

Cascade Environmental

Climate Change

Canada

British Columbia

824

Clinton Foundation / Clinton Climate Initiative

Climate Change

USA

New York

1042

Conservation Biology Institute

Conservation

USA

Oregon

1124

Conservation International

Conservation

USA

Virginia

745

CTG Energetics

Climate Change

USA

California

842

DR Systems

Climate Change

Canada

British Columbia

1045

ECP/Society for Conservation GIS

Conservation

USA

California

838

Explorer Graphics

Climate Change

New Zealand

 

727

International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives

Climate Change

USA

Massachusetts

943

International Forestry Resources & Institutions

Climate Change

USA

Michigan

849

Katerva Challenge

Climate Change

USA

Texas

731

Manhattan Software

Climate Change

USA

California

937

NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab

Climate Change

USA

California

737

National Center for Atmospheric Research

Climate Change

USA

Colorado

743

National Center for Conservation Science and Policy

Climate Change

USA

Oregon

1031

National Geographic Society

Conservation

USA

Washington, DC

1039

Natureserve

Conservation

USA

 

836

New Zealand Ministry for the Environment

Climate Change

New Zealand

 

1033

Orangutan Foundation International

Conservation

USA

California

930

PCI Geomatics

Climate Change

Canada

Ontario

931

Planet Action

Climate Change

France

 

830

REMSOFT

Climate Change

Canada

New Brunswick

945

Resources for the Future

Climate Change

USA

Washington, DC

832

Society of American Foresters

Climate Change

USA

Maryland

733

Southern California Association of Governments

Climate Change

USA

California

1038

The GIS Institute

Conservation

USA

NC

1037

The Greenbelt Movement

Conservation

Kenya

 

1130

The Jane Goodall Institute

Conservation

USA

Virginia

1025

The Nature Conservancy

Conservation

USA

Oregon

1036

The Trust for Public Land

Conservation

USA

New Mexico

1126

The Wilderness Society

Conservation

USA

Washington

1043

U.S. National Park Service

Conservation

USA

Colorado

739

United Nations University

Climate Change

Japan

 

833

USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station

Climate Change

USA

Oregon

1026

Wildlife Conservation Society

Conservation

USA

New York

827

Woods Hole Research Center

Climate Change

USA

Massachusetts

825

World Resources Institute

Climate Change

USA

Washington, DC

1032

World Vision International

Conservation

USA

California

1024

World Wildlife Fund

Conservation

USA

Washington, DC

 

 

 

SCHEDULE OF TALKS & PRESENTATIONS

 

--------TUESDAY--------


Conservation/Climate Change Demo Theater

(Ground Floor Convention Center, Hall C)


Tuesday, July 13: Conservation & Climate Change Presentations

   10:00 AM-10:45 AM  Promoting National Carbon Reduction: The Trans Canada Trail (Dave Williamson, Cascade Environmental)              

   11:00 AM-11:45 AM   GIS Software and Satellite Data Grants for NGOs (Louis-François Guerre, Planet Action)              

   12:00 PM-12:45 PM   Conservation Data Collaboration with Data Basin (James Strittholt, Conservation Biology Institute)

   1:00 PM-1:45 PM   Chugach Children’s Forest GeoForum: Innovation in outreach and collaboration (Ann Mayo-Kiely, Alaska Geographic)               

   2:00 PM-2:45 PM   The Atlas of Global Conservation: Mapping the Natural World Online (The Nature Conservancy)                        

   3:00 PM-3:45 PM   ArcGIS Server and Rich Internet Applications for Climate Change Applications (Michael Lippmann, Blue Raster)

   4:00 PM-4:45 PM   Tracking Land Use Change for Carbon Analysis (David Pimblott, Explorer Graphics)                       

   5:00 PM-5:45 PM   Carbon – Moving Beyond Compliance to Capturing Opportunity (Remsoft)                                  



ESRI Lecture Hall # 30B:
Ecology/Conservation Track

Tue, Jul 13, 8:30AM - 9:45AM Avian Conservation GIS

Using ArcGIS for Avian Conservation on Camp Pendleton, California
Harry Johnson, San Diego State University
Jennifer Vaughan, San Diego State University
The California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica) is a federally-listed threatened species and the coastal cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus couesi) is a California Species of Special Concern. Geographic methods were used to analyze the distribution of the coastal cactus wren and coastal California gnatcatcher populations within the boundary of Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. This study examines these species on part of the Base, approximately 101, 606 acres in area. Two objectives of this research were to identify the distribution of suitable habitat for both species and to identify core habitat areas and possible restoration and reintroduction sites for both species. These objectives were studied through habitat suitability modeling using ArcGIS ModelBuilder, and the identification of core habitat areas was determined using Kernel Density Estimation. This research supports the regional conservation effort in southern California for the coastal cactus wren and the coastal California gnatcatcher.


Modeling Avian Electrocution Susceptibility
Beth Forbus, AC/S Environmental Security
Anders Burvall, HDR
Dillon Fitch, HDR
Megan Sayles, AC/S Environmental Security, USMCB Camp Pendleton
An Avian Protection Plan (APP) is a voluntary program developed to protect and conserve migratory birds by reducing the operational and avian risks that result from avian interactions with electric utility facilities. The Avian Electrocution Susceptibility (AVES) spatial model was developed for Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton (MCBCP) as a part of their APP. AVES is a parsimonious additive model that predicts the risk for raptor electrocution and collision associated with all utility poles and towers on MCBCP. It is based on three inputs: raptor nesting data, vegetative habitat data, and raptor incident data. Implementation of the AVES model within the MCBCP’s APP establishes a GIS based framework for raptor incident data collection, and provides a cost effective data driven process to prioritize electric poles for retrofitting.


Using ArcGIS to Analyze Utah's Mexican Spotted Owl Habitats
Jason Carlisle, Utah State University, Wildland Resources Department
We sought to compile a comprehensive database of Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) protected activity centers (PACs) within Utah, determine how well the PACs capture modeled owl habitat, and make PAC delineating recommendations to biologists. PAC boundaries were originally drawn by field biologists around confirmed owl locations and were meant to include the adjacent best available habitat likely utilized by the owls. In addition to compiling digitally-drawn PAC boundaries, we used ArcGIS to digitize PACs hand-drawn by field biologists on hardcopy maps. We then compared the PACs with a spatial model of best available habitat created in 1996 and a stricter model created in 2000 by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. Results include comparisons between the 1996 and 2000 models. Both habitat models proved to be an effective resource for PAC delineation and guiding further owl surveys.

 

Tue, Jul 13, 10:15AM - 11:30AM Collaborative GIS in the Community

A geospatial framework for community-based planning in Hawai‘i
Henry Carter, NOAA Pacific Services Center
The NOAA Pacific Services Center and The Nature Conservancy worked together to develop a geospatial framework for the analysis and visualization of natural and cultural resources in a high priority watershed on the windward side of Oahu, Hawai‘i. GPS survey data were collected and integrated with existing geospatial data in ArcGIS to build out a four-dimensional geodatabase. Using high resolution land cover and elevation data, the project team also modeled erosion hotspots with an ArcGIS extension called the Nonpoint-Source Pollution and Erosion Comparison Tool. The erosion analysis overlays were assessed against sensitive habitat information and biodiversity criteria to understand critical conservation areas. Valuable agricultural lands and cultural resources were also mapped and considered in light of climate change and economic valuations. The data, analyses, and maps produced through this partnership will be used to inform the long-term vision and plan for the management and sustainability of the He‘eia Ahupua‘a.


Complex Ecological and Social Communities: A Perfect Storm for Collaboration
Chris Zanger, The Nature Conservancy
The Applegate Values Mapping Exercise was a process where a collaborative group was lead through a facilitate process to identify what values on the landscape they are most concerned about losing to an un-characteristic disturbance event (wildland fire, disease, etc). These values were then mapped across the whole watershed and summed so that areas where many of the values intersected became “hot-spots” and active management in those areas will address many of the values of concern. The results were averaged by Sub-Watershed (HUC 6) and scaled by Federal ownership to help our Federal partners prioritize planning efforts in those areas accordingly.


Natural Resources, Cultural Heritage, Politics and the Role of GIS
Matt Keefer, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Bureau of Forestry
Andrew Schwartz, Environmental Planning & Design LLC
Central Pennsylvania's 1,800-acre Spring Creek Canyon (SCC) is noted for its springs, geology, bio-diversity and cultural significance. The Sierra Club has designated SCC as one of the country's 52 most ecologically exceptional places needing protection. Slated for divestment from the State, SCC finds itself at the center of many politicized interests. Striking a balance between restoration, interpretation, research and recreation was the foundation of a consensus-driven resource conservation and management strategy. An essential part of the planning process was the development of spatial models created with ArcGIS Spatial Analyst®. Data compiled from 10 different sources and addressing more than 30 different typologies were standardized and analyzed. The analyses, based on a series 'conservation values', identified geographic areas suitable to support activities such as agriculture, forestry, habitat restoration, passive land recreation, water recreation, etc. The use of GIS proved to be essential in depoliticizing the planning process and outcomes.

 

Tue, Jul 13, 1:30PM - 2:45PM Conservation GIS Software Tools

A Conservation Ecology Toolbox
Charlene Nielsen, University of Alberta, Biological Sciences
The ACCRU Toolbox contains custom, ever-evolving tools created to answer ecological questions posed by researchers of the Alberta Conservation Cooperative Research Unit (ACCRU) at the University of Alberta. Although specific applications in conservation ecology form the basis of tool development – e.g. temporal analysis of polar bear sea ice habitat, proximity analyses of urban amphibian wetlands, forest harvest block edge crossing characterization, wolf behavioural cluster identification, landscape randomization, a changeable habitat model calculator, etc. – they are flexible enough for just about any ecologist's use. Several generic utilities are also included to help make data processing and other workflows more efficient. The open source of the Python language and ModelBuilder framework allows experienced users to modify the tools to help answer alternative questions.


Visual and Acoustic Tracking of Marine Mammals in Real Time.
CHRISTOPHER KYBURG, SSC Pacific
Angela D'Amico, SSC Pacific
Rowena Carlson, SSC Pacific
The Whale Identification, Logging and Display (WILD) software system was developed to assist researchers tracking marine mammals in real time. The WILD system was used successfully on the MED 09 sea trial in July-September 2009 aboard the NATO Research Vessel Alliance. Visual observations and acoustic observations from a range of devices were displayed in real time in multiple locations of the ship. All observations were transmitted over the ship’s network using custom data sentences developed by the researchers based on the National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) 183 standard. The custom software extended ArcMap by allowing it to read and parse these sentences and update the maps in real time. This allowed scientists, biologists, and the ship’s crew to tightly coordinate their efforts, permitting the best possible data collection and observation of the animals. The research provides scientists with better estimates whale populations and their behavior in the Western Mediterranean Sea.


A System for Collecting and Managing Biodiversity Observation Data
Lori Scott, NatureServe
Rob Solomon, NatureServe
NatureServe, with funding from the National Science Foundation, is developing a handheld observation system for field inventory and mapping to improve the geospatial data capture of biological features. The goals of the system are to 1) improve the accuracy, precision, and documentation of geospatial data for inventories of species and ecological communities, and decrease time from data capture to data sharing; 2) increase the efficiency and productivity of field research by introducing elements of location-aware computing into the field data collection process; and 3) enhance information sharing and interoperability between collections and observation-oriented data networks. This session will demonstrate the complete system workflow, from defining a new observation survey template to creating forms for the mobile data collection device to uploading collected observation records to the ArcGIS Server based observation management system.

Tue, Jul 13, 3:15PM - 4:30PM Conservation Planning and Assessment

A Regional Watershed Based Conservation Assessment
Hugh Irwin, Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition
In the course of regional conservation work there is the need for a tool to systematically evaluate conditions from the local level through the landscape and regional levels so that conservation progress and successes can be documented. Equally important is the ability to identify where conservation conditions are stable and where conditions are deteriorating. An assessment tool is needed to comprehensively evaluate terrestrial and aquatic ecological health and integrity measures. For a variety of reasons a watershed level assessment provides a convenient, ecologically relevant, and scalable model for addressing regional conservation issues in a comprehensive and integrative approach. A watershed assessment process will be presented that is being applied in the Southern Appalachian region. The assessment develops metrics of ecological health and integrity within watersheds that can be consolidated to larger watersheds and ultimately to the regional level. The approach could have application in other regions.


Growing Up: Replacing AutoCAD Maps With ArcGIS
Ericka Witcher, Montgomery Botanical Center
In 2007 Montgomery Botanical Center received an ESRI BGZ grant to implement a full-fledged GIS. Since then, MBC has successfuly converted all map files from AutoCAD format to ArcMap features through importation and georeferencing; subsequently all related programs and their protocols have been changed as well. These consist of: 1) using a GPS unit (and associated software) to map all new features and changes, 2) tracking data between the existing plant records database and the maps, 3) creation of customized infrastructure and natural resource maps for staff, researchers, and visitors, 4) locating plants, and 5) conducting annual inventory of over 11,000 individual plants. The future holds new challenges (eg. database communication) but also invigorating opportunities for on-site research and assessment (eg. LIDAR applications, soil maps, incident effects). Open to roundtable discussion of alternative methods and miscellaneous problem-solving.


Community GIS for Conservation Awareness
Mahesh Pathak, SCGIS Nepal
Geographic knowledge and ideas are not new concepts for human being. But, use of computer technology has widened the gap of geographic understating between the local people and GIS professionals. The concepts of 'Community GIS' stands on the spatial knowledge of local people and community base organization, their keen interest to understand the geographic analysis carried out by GIS professionals and lacks of geographic approach to build up common spatial understating. Community GIS aims to enhance the spatial thinking of local community and empower their decision making process. It aim to establish two way communication among GIS expert and local community which is not addressed by Participatory GIS. Community GIS approach for this paper is based on the experience of GIS application at community level in Nepal. This approach has applied through the establishment of ‘Community GIS Centre’ to update biodiversity resource database of Belshazzar Wetland Complex in Nepal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

- - -WEDNESDAY - - -

Conservation/Climate Change Demo Theater

(Ground Floor Convention Center, Hall C)


Wednesday, July 14, 2010 9:15-12:30:
Society for Conservation GIS International Scholars Program


9:15 AM - 10:45 AM: Community Based Conservation GIS (The Society for Conservation GIS (SCGIS)
"Application Of Gis For Conservation Awareness In The Protected Areas Of Nepal"
Ashok Pathak, Scgis Nepal      

"Subsistence Hunting Patterns By Yekwanas And Sanemas Indigenous Communities In Ka’kada River Watershed, Upper Caura, Bolivar State, Venezuela.  "
Lucy Elena Perera Romero,  Wildlife Conservation Society Venezuela  

"Spatial Potentials For Development Of Settlement System (Example Of Municipality Kočevje) "
Rok Ciglič,  Anton Melik Geographical Institute, Slovenia     

"Conservation Gis In Bhutan"
Kinley Gyeltshen, Wwf   Bhutan  

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM: GIS Tools for Wildlife (The Society for Conservation GIS (SCGIS)
"Ecological And Anthropogenic Influences On Habitat Suitability For The Mountain Gorilla In Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda"
Dennis Babaasa, Bishop Barham University College,   Uganda  

"Mammal Population Estimates In Zambia. "
Priscilla Sichone,  Scgis Zambia Chapter 

"Using Geographic Information System-Based Cost-Distance Models To Identify Potential Wildlife Corridors Within An Important Tiger Landscape In Malaysia"
Emmelia Azli Bt Ayub, Wwf Malaysia  

"Guanacos Of The Argentinean Dry Chaco: Identifying Conservation Strategies And Public Policies About The Situation Of Its Population And Its Habitat."
Cristian Fernando Schneider, Assn For The Conservation And Study Of Nature, Argentina 

 

1PM - 5:45PM : Conservation & Climate Change Presentations

1:00 PM - 1:45: Southern Forests for the Future - Sharing information on changing southern US forests with interactive maps (World Resources Institute (WRI)

2:00 PM - 2:45 PM: Landscope America: Inspiring Conservation with Online Maps (NatureServe)

3:00 PM - 3:45 PM: Airborne Laser Scanning (Lidar) for Carbon Stock Assessment (Arbonaut)

4:00 PM - 4:45 PM: Ecosystem Services: An Integrated Total Landscape Approach (Don Reimer, D.R. Systems)

5:00 PM 5:45 PM: Conservation Data Collaboration with Data Basin (James Strittholt, Conservation Biology Institute)


 

 

 

ESRI Lecture Hall # 30B:
Ecology/Conservation Track

Wed, Jul 14, 10:15AM - 11:30AM Landscape Analysis

Decision Tree Delineating of Prominent Ridgelines in Los Angeles
Sepalika Gunaratne, City of Los Angeles
The city of Los Angeles identified ridgeline vistas as one of Los Angeles’ natural resources. Historically, development has occurred on lower lying, easily developable lands. Increasing population and social factors have contributed to escalate destruction of ridges. Although most of the ridgelines are protected by existing city ordinances there are still many hillside areas left unprotected. Therefore, identifying all prominent ridgelines in the city is vital for cataloging all unprotected ridgelines, analyzing the existing ridgeline protection regulation, and recommending any further protection measures. USGS Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with 10m spatial resolution was used as an input for this study. In order to detect ridgelines from DEM, specific catchment areas were calculated. Boundaries of watershed areas were used as a “skeleton” for the ridgeline detection process. A decision tree, which was based on topographic positioning index, curvature and slope, was developed to differentiate prominent ridgelines from spurious ridgelines.


Using GIS in Kona Eco-site data: Using data for land inventory, analysis and management decisions for forest and rangelands.
Reese Libby, Natural Resources Conservation Service
NRCS is involved with restoration and conservation practices on forest and rangelands. They have developed ecological site descriptions (ESDs) nationally that are based on extensive field data and GIS analysis. ESDs are useful information sources for land management. On the Big Island of Hawaii ESDs have nearly been completed. ESDs describe vegetation types and disturbance pathways between them. Each ESD is correlated to map units of the NRCS soil survey, from which a map of the ESD can be generated. This presentation will cover the different ESDs in the Kona area. This data will be a complement to other data that is available to do analysis, land inventory and making land management decisions for the rangeland and forestlands. The ecological site description is the document that will contain information about the individual ecological sites. The information contains four categories. 1. Site Characteristics -- Identifies the site and describes the physiographic, climate, soil, and water features associated with the site. 2. Plant Communities -- Describes the ecological dynamics and the common plant communities comprising the various vegetation states of the site. The disturbances that cause a shift from one state to another are also described. 3. Site Interpretations -- Interpretive information pertinent to the use and management of the site and its related resources. 4. Supporting Information – Provides information on sources of information and data utilized in developing the site description and the relationship of the site to other ecological sites. GIS is a useful tool to interpret this data.

Wed, Jul 14, 1:30PM - 2:45PM Wildlife Analysis and Habitat Suitability

Rafinesque’s big-eared bat and southeastern myotis roost selection in Mississippi
Heather Fleming, Mississippi State University
Jeanne Jones, Mississippi State University
Jerrold Belant, Mississippi State University
Jonathan Fleming, Mississippi State University
Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) and southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) are federal category two candidate species for protection. Bottomland hardwood forests are important roosting sites for both species and more than eighty percent of these forests have been degraded in Mississippi. There is limited information on roost selection or how these sympatric species partition roost sites. Our objectives are to quantify roost selection and examine habitat partitioning of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat and southeastern myotis at the landscape scale. Utilizing GIS, we will predict the location of roosts with landscape level metrics including distance to nearest water, tree composition and basal area. Our findings will be used to construct a GIS model for predicting potential areas of use and habitat segregation. This applied study utilizing analytical GIS tools will aide in the conservation of these unique bat species.


BioMap 2.0: A Conservation Vision for a Changing Climate
Jessica Dyson, The Nature Conservancy
The Massachusetts State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) calls for the identification, prioritization, and protection of lands that best provide viable wildlife habitat in a future made uncertain by climate change. The product of a collaboration between the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program, The Nature Conservancy, The University of Massachusetts, and the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences, BioMap 2.0 spatially defines those resilient lands and provides the scientifically rigorous foundation for their protection. BioMap 2.0 combines core habitat for rare and declining SWAP species with newly identified, modeled areas of high ecological integrity. Measures of landscape connectivity, ecological resilience, and relative vulnerability to climate change are applied to these habitats to capture their most viable examples across the state. The result is a strategy to safeguard the breadth of biodiversity across Massachusetts into the future, as well as a model for other states to enhance their own plans with climate considerations.

Wed, Jul 14, 3:15PM - 4:30PM Wildlife Management and Decision Support

Using a Return on Investment Approach to Prioritize Habitat Restoration
Jutta Burger, Irvine Ranch Conservancy
Yi-Chin Fang, Irvine Ranch Conservancy
Ecological restoration is an expensive, time-intensive process that requires complex decision-making and involves multiple variables, such as when and where to restore, which methodologies to apply, and how much money to invest. Using a decision-theoretic framework, we develop a spatially and temporally explicit prioritization model that accounts for: 1) cost of restoration, 2) likelihood of success, 3) probability of a catastrophic fire, and 4) benefit in terms of area restored, spatial connectivity, and relative contribution of a site toward landscape-scale ecological resilience. We explore the sensitivity of our results to uncertainties in key parameters and compare restoration schedules under alternative benefit functions to demonstrate trade-offs associated with different objectives and assumptions. Our prioritization model demonstrates time and resource efficiency to managers and provides a transparent and adaptable decision-making process. The resulting Return on Investment framework can be adapted temporally to changing conditions and be applied to any protected landscape.


Collaboratively Tracking Implementation and Effectiveness of Desert Tortoise Recovery
Catherine Darst, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Lisa Benvenuti, Redlands Institute, University of Redlands
Naicong Li, University of Redlands
Nathan Strout, Redlands Institute, University of Redlands
Philip Murphy, InfoHarvest Inc.
Roy Averill-Murray, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The recovery strategy for the threatened Mojave desert tortoise emphasizes partnerships and science to implement, track, and evaluate recovery. Recovery Implementation Teams, comprised of land managers, stakeholders, and scientists, work together to prioritize recovery actions on the ground and assess results in a spatial decision support system (SDSS). The SDSS is an interactive system that computes the output of a set of models (e.g. effects of a threat on a tortoise population) based on underlying databases (e.g. spatial extent of the threat, tortoise population, and management actions). The system incorporates a range-wide geospatial database of current management activities, threats, and tortoise population parameters, providing managers a framework for recognizing and implementing successful recovery actions. Recovery Implementation Teams use the system to predict outcomes of different management scenarios to prioritize efforts, identify vital data gaps, track implementation, and examine correlations between management actions or threat reduction and tortoise populations.


Mobile Mapping of Fish Movements in the Lower Missouri River
Kim Chojnacki, US Geological Survey
Aaron DeLonay, US Geological Survey
Multidisciplinary research is being conducted to investigate sturgeon spawning movement and habitat use in the Lower Missouri River. An extensive telemetry effort using two sturgeon species (pallid and shovelnose sturgeon) relies on a customized ArcPad application to record sturgeon relocation events and search efforts. Customized forms streamline data entry by prompting users to collect data for each telemetry location event or search effort. The custom electronic forms reduce errors by automatically verifying data entered by field crews. Interactive drop-down lists are used to expedite data entry and further reduce entry errors. By electronically capturing information at the time of collection, the forms within ArcPad eliminate data entry by office personnel. Data for sturgeon relocations and search efforts are uploaded to a secure server on a daily basis using a secure internet webpage, ensuring near real-time data delivery and reporting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

- - -THURSDAY - - -

Conservation/Climate Change Demo Theater

(Ground Floor Convention Center, Hall C)

9:00-12:00 Society for Conservation GIS
International Scholars Program


9:00AM - 10:30AM GIS and Remote Sensing techniques for Forest assessment and conservation

"Forestry Operations And Performance Monitoring In Russia Using Remote Sensing "
Yuliya E. Zenkevich  Non-Profit Partnership "Transparent World",  Russia  

 "Remote Sensing Applied Do Indentify The Potential Areas Of Occurrence Of Golden Grass At Jalapão State Park, In Tocantins State, Brazil."
Gabriel Antunes Daldegan, Tnc Brazil   

"Gis For Planning And Management Of Forest National Parks"
Fredrick  Wanyama   Uganda Wildlife Authority,  Uganda, 

"Forest Cover Assessment To Monitor Conservation Management In East Kalimantan"
Lenny Christy Ong, Tnc  Indonesia 

"Landscape Dynamics Of An Atlantic Montane Rainforest In Trajano De Moraes, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil."
Camila Linhares De Rezende   - State Park Of Ilha Grande, Brazil  

 

10:30AM - 12:00PM Climate change impacts in forest ecosystems
"Protecting Highly Threatened Araucaria Forest By Designing A Mechanism For Small Landowners To Enter The Carbon Market."
Marlon Prestes, Society For Wildlife Research And Environmental Education   Brazil  

"Establishing Co2 Emission Baseline For A Redd+ (Reducing Emission From Deforestation And Degradation) Project In The Fandriana Vondrozo Forest Corridor (Madagascar)"
Andriambolantsoa Rasolohery,   Conservation International  Madagascar 

"Protected Area In The City: Integrated Watershed Management In A Divided Community"
Simeona Medina Martinez, Univ Philippines Dept. Of Geography

"Guanacos Of The Argentinean Dry Chaco: Identifying Conservation Strategies And Public Policies About The Situation Of Its Population And Its Habitat."
Cristian Fernando Schneider, Assn For The Conservation And Study Of Nature, Argentina 

 

1PM - 1:30 : Conservation & Climate Change Presentations

1:00PM - 1:30PM Using GIS to Track Internal Displacement in Eastern Burma (Lyndy Worsham, Thailand Burma Border Consortium)

 

 


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